My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—There is to me a very puzzling element in Secretary of State Dulles' recent statement regarding Lebanon, and in fact it is something that has always troubled me as regards the Eisenhower Doctrine in the Near East.

Although we denounced France and Great Britain for attacking Egypt, we agreed in the Eisenhower Doctrine to come to the aid—and apparently this includes military aid—of any nation where aggression can be proved. I have always supposed this to mean that we would come to the aid of such a nation through the U. N., because I do not see how our nation by itself could possibly use military force merely because another nation in a given area said it was the victim of aggression. It seems to me that would be committing the same mistake that France and Great Britain did unless we took the question first to the U. N. and obtained their authorization.

If we did that, it would be more than likely that nations which had no immediate interest in the area would be asked to furnish troops, while our help would be limited to economic aid and would not entail the use of American soldiers or those of any of the other great countries in these areas of the world. On the whole, I believe this is a much wiser solution, because it would also mean that the Soviet Union could not actively engage its troops. The more we establish the fact that neither Russian nor our own troops are to be used, the safer it will be for all of us.

Thus I wish very much that our Secretary of State and other high government officials would think more often of participation with and through the U. N. and less often of unilateral action. Lebanon certainly hopes to do all it possibly can for itself, and people with experience in this part of the world have spoken to me in the highest terms of President Chamoun as a world statesman. One can only hope that it will be possible for the U. N. to help create a climate in which this statesmanship can be exercised freely. The U. N. mission that has gone to Lebanon may be the means of creating this atmosphere and we will watch their work and the Secretary General's visit with close interest.

Visitors to New York as well as local residents will be interested to know that the Brooklyn Academy of Music will celebrate its 100th anniversary during the 1958-59 season. The celebration will include a program of cultural events, and if you will write in for the booklets on these events I think you will find that there is something to meet every taste. The Academy of Music is a non-profit, civic institution operating on a membership plan. This coming year they will have musical treats of widespread appeal. One of their most popular programs has been their travel and adventure film series, and this year 28 of these films will be shown. There are also other interesting activities, and you can learn about them by getting in touch with the Brooklyn Academy of Music, 30 Lafayette Avenue, Brooklyn 17, N.Y. This is a division of the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL