My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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DANBURY, Conn.—I attended a dinner last week for Stanley H. Lowell, one of New York Mayor Robert F. Wagner's assistants, a young man who I think has promise of a real future in public service.

The Mayor spoke with real warmth about him, and Mrs. David Levy, who is president of the Citizens Committee for Children, which sponsored the dinner, beamed on this young man who she thinks has done well in his efforts to serve the children of New York City.

After dinner that night I motored to Hyde Park and Friday morning went with my son, John, and his wife to the graduation of their son, Haven, at Millbrook School.

I think Millbrook School has concentrated on assembling an interesting faculty and I could not help being struck by the academic level achieved by this graduating class.

Edward Pulling, the headmaster, gave a short talk at parting which was one of the best I have ever heard. He told the graduates the story of a young Army aviator who has to make a split-second decision. Then he said the graduates might never have to make that kind of decision but that from the day they left Millbrook they would be faced with many other decisions.

The preparation, he said, they have given themselves to meet these decisions, and their ability to carry them out once they have been made, would count in their ability to judge wisely.

I hope the boys will ponder these few words of wisdom, for they certainly are true in the daily life of every man and woman.

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I have just been told by the Hannah Harrison School, which retrains women and is sponsored by the YWCA in the District of Columbia, that a number of its scholarships have not been used in the past year. This seems to me a great waste of opportunity, for many of the women whom the school has retrained have success stories to tell.

There are a number of women who need retraining when it becomes necessary for them to earn their own living unexpectedly or when they have to change jobs, so not to know of this school and use its facilities seems unfortunate.

Members of a New York Democratic Club went up to Hyde Park, N.Y., last Saturday to visit the Memorial. I went over to the Library to greet them after having had at my house a pleasant picnic lunch to which Mr. and Mrs. Henry Morgenthau Jr. brought Mr. and Mrs. Leon Keyserling and Mr. and Mrs. Jim Lanigan with their two children.

It is still cold enough to enjoy sitting in the sun, and I particularly enjoyed hearing the gentlemen discuss the economic situation of the country.

No matter how gloomy people may be, I cannot help feeling that our problems are not as great as those of France and we had better preserve some optimism and hope for wise solutions in the near future.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL