My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

HYDE PARK—France's situation seems extremely serious. Instead of a calmly negotiated settlement, it looks as though there would be one which finally did not suit France's desires and which would be settled in anything but a calm atmosphere. One can but hope that whatever is done will eventually be for the benefit of the people of both countries, though in the present situation one doubts whether the Algerians will have a very happy time with the French generals—who seem bound on some kind of dictatorship.

It is a relief to know that President Eisenhower is sufficiently concerned over the recent plane accidents to have given orders covering military jet flights and that the White House promises a series of steps to be taken as "interim measures to minimize the danger of mid-air collisions." Air traffic has increased to such an extent that not only interim but permanent rules must be worked out. As time goes on these should be changed and improved, for unless these rules are carefully followed up the danger of collision is going to become greater and greater. No one would have thought a few years ago that it would have been necessary to work out such rules, but today this is essential to the safety of both military and commercial planes.

Nelson Rockefeller finds himself in a rather difficult position politically. He still insists he is not a candidate for Governor at this time, yet he is given the Westchester Republican Committee's unanimous endorsement! He must be hopeful that sometime he will become "available," because accepting these endorsements means that he really wants the nomination.

I think all of us must be gratified that in spite of some unfortunate incidents in South America we have had one cultural exchange which has been highly successful. According to La Prensa of May 14, the N. Y. Philharmonic Orchestra under Leonard Bernstein received an ovation in Lima, Peru. We are sending to South America a number of different groups to demonstrate our interest in cultural exchanges. For example, a theatrical group from Catholic University in Washington will also probably have a great success.

I was sorry to hear the other day that though there have been a number of inquiries from various entertainment sources, we seem to be sending a rather limited amount of entertainment to be shown at our exhibition headquarters at the Brussels World Fair. One protest I have received comes from the Victoria Productions, a group interested in puppet plays. Marionettes are very popular in Europe, yet I am told there is to be nothing whatsoever from the U. S. along these lines. It is too bad that we have limited our appropriations so much that we must also limit what might be an opportunity to show our talents along lines in which the Europeans do not credit us with much ability.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL