My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—I am glad that an American was awarded first prize in the Soviet Union's international Tchaikovsky piano competition, for it emphasizes the fact that we do think enough of cultural advances to produce young people who can be successful in the arts.

As you probably know, the winner was Van Cliburn, 23 years old and hailing from the state of Texas but now living in New York City. The second prize was divided between a Chinese student and a Soviet student.

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It has been brought to my attention that the United Nations International School, which was established in 1949 as an outgrowth of a nursery school set up in 1947 at Lake Success by the U.N. Secretariat, has now decided to establish itself here in New York.

The administration and responsibility for educational matters is vested in the Board of Trustees of the Association for the U.N. International School. It operates under an absolute charter granted by the Board of Regents of the State of New York.

The school, being part of the United Nations' interests, naturally makes no distinction among pupils as to race, sex, language, or religion and, therefore, tries to lay the foundations of a real international education and to combine the best features of the different school systems of the world.

The children attending this school come here from all parts of the world, so here is where they become adjusted to American life, since they are to live in this country for a number of years. The main objective of the school is, of course, to give a comprehensive education to the children of the staff of the Secretariat of the U.N. and other personnel associated with U.N. work, but wisely they have decided to accept children from other families who desire to have their children learn, while young, something about an international atmosphere.

Many people will recognize, I think, the value of having such a school in Manhattan and will be glad to hear that it may be possible to obtain the land needed in the Kipps Bay Park Development area. This is not, of course, an undertaking that can be paid for from U.N. funds, and so the people of New York will have to take an interest in this establishment and give their backing to the Board of Trustees.

Let us hope that there will be some charitable foundations that will think well of this project and lend their help, as well as individuals who can also be of assistance.

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I was sent the other day some copies of a magazine called World Theatre which I found extremely interesting and had never seen before. It covers the theatre of many, many lands and is published by the International Theatre Institute with the assistance of UNESCO.

I think many people who are in the theatre will be glad to subscribe for this magazine, finding it fascinating to study the theatre in various parts of the world.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL