My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

NEW YORK—I spent Monday afternoon in Albany, N.Y. arriving there in time for a press conference at the Sheraton Ten Eyck Hotel and a meeting with other organizations interested in working for the United Nations.

At 6 o'clock we all went over to the Executive Mansion for a dinner which Governor Averell Harriman, who had just returned from Florida, gave. On his return North he had been unable to land at Idlewild Airport and, after three hours of circling, his plane finally landed in Philadelphia. As a result, the Governor reached home in New York at 3 a.m.

He was a delightful host and had gathered together a number of my own contemporaries as well as a number of younger people interested in the United Nations. He asked Mrs. Jonathan Bingham to let me look over the old mansion and I must say, from what they tell me, Mrs. Lehman contributed some very practical conveniences for purposes of entertaining.

On the whole, the rooms are still used in much the same way they were in my husband's day, but the pictures which had belonged to Mr. Harriman's mother and which he has brought from Arden House certainly fit in beautifully with the period of the mansion. This means, of course, they are not by modern artists, but they nevertheless add color and charm to the rooms.

The meeting afterwards was well attended in spite of the bad weather, and it cleared up sufficiently so that our plane was not very late in arriving in New York.

On Tuesday morning Clark Eichelberger, Miss Pat Baillargeon and I left by train for Wilmington, Del. I had the pleasure of lunching with Mrs. Charlotte Shedd, whose little daughter is my godchild and who lives in nearby Arden, Del.

At 2:15 p.m. I was in the City Council chambers to be photographed with a painting of my husband, and then I proceeded to a press conference and a meeting of students of the University of Delaware. Some high school newspapers were represented at the regular press conference, so youth in this particular area is interested in the United Nations.

There was an early dinner and an evening meeting before we boarded the train for Norfolk, Va.

On the way down I read two articles in Look magazine. One was a story about Mrs. Nikita S. Khrushchev, written by Gwen Robyns. It is interesting, not so much for what it tells about the lady herself but for what it reveals about this strange, imperious dictator.

The other article was an interview with Israeli Premier David Ben-Gurion. It is interesting but does not deal with reality, for it asks him such questions as "Would you be willing to meet with Nasser?" Of course he would be, but it would be impossible for such a meeting to take place. Feelings run too high on both sides for such a meeting to be consummated without too much risk to both leaders.

One of the significant things Ben-Gurion said was, "We are the only real Middle Eastern nation here. Only the Jews speak the same language and practice the same faith as in Biblical times. No other people in Syria, Lebanon, Iraq and Egypt preserve their national language or culture."

This is an interesting thought and testifies to the fact that the Israelis have been able in an extraordinary way to amalgamate the many nationalities pouring into their country.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL