My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON—I am hearing more and more about the experiments being carried on in educational TV. It appears probable that before long some of the best teachers in the whole country may be able to give initial courses that can be seen in every school throughout the nation,

This would certainly spur the local teachers to keep up, so that they would be able to help their students follow these "master courses" to the best advantage. Even in the teaching of science, I understand it will be possible to have these outstanding teachers on TV follow through into actual laboratory work, with the local teachers helping where help is needed. This may revolutionize a great deal of our teaching.

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Last Monday evening I went to the Pension Fund Benefit Concert given by the New York Philharmonic at Carnegie Hall, under the direction of Dmitri Mitropoulos. The first part of the program was delightful and beautifully given, but after the intermission there was a large question mark—when the management carefully announced that it was in no way responsible for the rest of the program, which was under the direction of Danny Kaye!

I thought the orchestra was simply remarkable in the way they played up to him. He has, of course, a remarkable musical gift. Without being able to read a line of music, he has such an amazing musical memory that when the symphony orchestra in Israel deliberately tried to fool him by playing something wrong, he caught them every time.

He kept the audience at Carnegie Hall laughing as I'm sure an audience there has rarely laughed before. He clowned, and he managed to get the dignified musicians to join with him, so that the original question mark was more than answered by the peals of laughter from the audience. I am sure everyone found the evening rewarding.

On Tuesday I went to Chicago, to speak at the Rotary Club luncheon on "The UN and the Major Issues Before It." They distributed a booklet called "Pathway to Peace", which covers the U.S. proposals for the control of the reduction of armaments. I believe the booklet was issued by what was once Mr. Harold Stassen's office in the government, but I'm sure it can be obtained from the American Association For The U.N., by anyone who wishes to write for it.

I wish the newspapers would publish, in two parallel columns, the suggestions made by the U.S. and the ones made by the Soviet Union, with dates, so that we could know exactly how these negotiations have been going forward, both in the Disarmament Conference of the U.N. and on a unilateral basis outside the U.N..

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I am interested to see the jobless total recently published. The papers say it is the highest number of unemployed we have had in this country in 16 years. The Democrats have offered a bill in the House to add 16 weeks of aid for the idle. This is perhaps a good stopgap, but it is no real answer to getting the people back to work.

It will keep us afloat temporarily, so to speak, by not removing the buying power of a whole group of unemployed, but it is no basic remedy for the situation.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL