My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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SAN FRANCISCO—On Friday afternoon I spent a very pleasant time at Stanford University as the guest of student groups and the university. When I had finished my lecture and met for half an hour with various student leaders, I went—at the invitation of Chuck Halsted, my daughter's stepson—to meet with some of his friends and a group of foreign students at dinner.

One of the Indian students had made Indian bread and vegetable filled patties as a pre-dinner appetizer. Then we ate buffet style and talked.

It seems to me that many foreign students in this country must find many phases of life bewildering, but the students at Stanford raise scholarships for foreign students and take a great deal of interest in helping them to adjust to American life. I think this is valuable not only for the foreign students but for our students, who will learn a great deal from their activities.

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As usual I am finding it a little difficult to keep abreast of the news on this trip, but I gather that some Republican appointees are having difficult times and are being accused of actions somewhat similar to, if slightly more expensive than, the accusations in President Truman's day of mink coats and deep freezes. The truth of the matter is, of course, that among politicians just as in private life people ask you to do a kind thing for a friend.

People are apt to become confused between their public and private lives and that, I believe, is what leads to the trouble. No real wrong just inadvertence, but it certainly can be made very disagreeable.

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I have been asked to remind my readers this year of the Red Cross March campaign for members and funds. The Red Cross is obliged to raise an unprecedented amount of money—$95,000,000. The slogan and the theme for the campaign will be "On The Job - For You".

The Red Cross receives no subsidy from the Federal government, though it is officially designed by act of Congress to provide services to the armed forces and relieve the suffering of victims of disaster. Its funds come exclusively from voluntary membership contributions.

Red Cross activities for the American people include the blood program, first aid and water safety, nursing, community and international relations, and Junior Red Cross. These services are provided by about 2,000,000 volunteers and a professional staff of 14,296 people.

A series of terrible disasters during the last two and a half years have wiped out the disaster reserves and the inadequate funds that had been set aside for national emergencies. That is why, this year, they must replenish these funds and raise enough more to fulfill their day by day obligations as well as the work which they do overseas.

We have become so accustomed to accepting the Red Cross as an institution that very often we do not realize how frequently it touches our daily lives and how much we depend upon its services. This is why it is so necessary to remind each and every individual in the U.S. that they must give whatever they can during the March campaign or their Red Cross will be unable to meet its obligations.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL