My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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BUFFALO, N. Y.—We had an uneventful trip from Grand Rapids, Mich., to Cleveland last Friday and then drove from there to Elyria, which is about 18 miles away. I spoke in Elyria for the Elyria Women's Club, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary.

The objects of the club, stated very well, I think, in its yearly report, are:

"The purposes for which said corporation is formed are to promote sympathetic and united efforts among its members for intellectual development and for the improvement of social and civic conditions in the community; to provide and maintain a central meeting place, and facilities in connection therewith, and, to do all other things incidental thereto."

Elyria, like Grand Rapids, is a city of homes rather than of apartment houses. Some of the homes are quite large. The Women's Club bought an old residence of a prominent citizen. Looked upon as a landmark in the community, it is spacious and comfortable.

I think a club of this kind is needed more in a city where, they tell me, the women themselves must do a great deal of their own work because domestic help is unavailable as a result of industrial development.

One of the young women told me that in cities of that kind entertainment has been made informal and simple and usually young couples form into little groups or cliques and keep on meeting together rather than bringing in new friends.

In other words, the women are kept busy by their homes and their children. The clubhouse is really needed as a meeting place for people of different interests. The club seems to have been a really moving force in the community.

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The Venezuela revolt against that country's dictator government seems to have promised a return to civil liberties and a free election.

The military junta, which brought back order out of the chaos, has now added two civilian members to the government group. It has ordered the abolition of censorship, all Caracas newspapers have begun to appear again, and the new junta president has announced that he wants to establish friendly relations with all nations. Venezuela had broken off relations with both the Argentine and Chile.

South American republics seem to have a difficult time growing up, but it is hoped the time will come when changes will be made by vote and not by revolution.

* * *

It was interesting to note that the Cleveland Plain Dealer has more news of the world and of domestic events that touch upon the world situation than many newspapers in other places that I have visited lately.

The newspaper even reported a speech by Senator J. William Fulbright which must have been hard to swallow by some of the good Republicans of that area, though I imagine the majority of Republicans there are not as much for the President as they are for the old-time Republican party.

Fulbright says that we must bring about a true revival of learning and he does not think the President's proposals are sufficient to do this.

The first real debate on partisan lines in the Senate seems to have come on education. I am glad of this, for I think the President's proposals should be given very careful consideration, and the decision should be on whether they are adequate or inadequate to accomplish this country's aims for education.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL