My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—The King of Morocco's visit to this country is a very happy occasion, it seems to me, for I hope it may strengthen his already-keen interest in this country and may mean a greater economic interest by United States businessmen in investment possibilities in Morocco.

From the King's visit there also may develop some exchanges of students between his country and ours. The King of Morocco is, I think, one of the people with the greatest desire for peace and good understanding between the West and the North African Arab nations, which can form a bridge between the West and the Near East.

I had the pleasure of being at the United Nations here the other afternoon to hear a short but delightful speech by the King. And it was a pleasure to be allowed to sit with the three Princesses who came to hear their father.

I am sorry not to have been able to show in some slight measure my thanks to them for their hospitality to me in Morocco last spring. However, our State Department, as usual, gave our visitors so much to do that I am afraid they were overwhelmed by official engagements and just too weary to do anything unimportant and unofficial.

There is one activity just begun by Israel which I hope will be a gesture acceptable to the Arab nations of the Near East and help toward peace in that area.

This is the establishment by the Middle East Scholarship Fund of 10 fellowships for scientists or advanced science students of the Middle East area at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel.

These fellowships are in the fields of physics, chemistry and biology, and students from Israel's Arab neighbors certainly could take from such study much that would be helpful to their own countries.

This gesture should be accepted by Israel's neighbors, for it will work toward a greater understanding among people who take advantage of it.

I went to an exhibition of paintings at New York's E. & A. Silberman Galleries the other night. It was a preview of an exhibit for the American Association for the United Nations, and I was happy that we could all enjoy such a distinguished collection.

One of the loveliest paintings in the collection is a Madonna and Child by Duccio di Buoninsegna, and I was tempted to steal—had it been possible—a little diptych of Nicola Froment in which the portraits of "King Rene and Queen Jeanne de Laval" face each other.

In fact, there were few paintings in this collection that I would not have enjoyed spending a great deal of time looking at in detail. They were beautifully hung and lighted.

All of the guests seemed to enjoy themselves, for Mr. Silberman is a delightful host and makes you feel that he is letting you share with him his own joy at having gathered together so much beauty.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL