My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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MINNEAPOLIS—Dag Hammarskjold, Secretary General of the United Nations, was alluded to the other day as a "fireman" rushing to all the danger spots in the world.

This is certainly true, and whenever he goes on such a peace mission, he generates a feeling of satisfaction. For Mr. Hammarskjold has created among all members of the U.N. a respect for his impartiality and skill in bringing people of different views together and adjusting difficult situations.

He is dealing with a difficult one in the Jordanian-Israeli crisis, and everyone who wants peace will wish him success.

This points up for all of us the value of U.N. machinery in keeping world peace. Every member nation supporting the Secretary General when he goes forth on these journeys needs the voice of the people to strengthen the official position. This is one reason why I think important the associations for the U.N. in the 42 countries where they now exist.

Our own Association for the United Nations in the United States is growing stronger. But to do more work, more money is needed and therefore we are undertaking new ways of raising it.

One way to bring people together is through art, which can speak with equal force to all nations of the world. And so Mrs. Oswald B. Lord and myself are honorary chairmen for the preview of an art show next Monday evening at the Silberman Galleries, 1014 Madison Avenue, New York. Preview tickets are $10, but the show is open for only 75 cents a ticket from next Tuesday through December 28.

This art show celebrates the 10th anniversary of Human Rights Day. Since I was first chairman of the U.N. Human Rights Commission and Mrs. Lord followed me as the U.S. member on the commission, we were asked to be honorary chairmen.

Paintings in the exhibition cover the period from the 14th Century to the contemporary art of today, with 30 works of art having been loaned for the occasion by private collectors and museums here and abroad. Paintings from 15 U.N. member nations will be on view, so this promises to be an event which will draw persons from the various U.N. countries together in an appreciation of the art of many lands.

I was glad to see a proposal made to reinstate Robert Oppenheimer in government service. He never should have been dropped, and it is heartening to see that we have regained a certain amount of sanity and may be ready to use again one of the best, if not the best, scientist in this country.

It is possible, of course, that Mr. Oppenheimer may not consider returning to government service. I know that there are people today in many fields who are not anxious to work for the government, but the situation in the field of science is so grave that I hope the really good men can be brought in.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL