My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK—The King of Morocco is visiting in the United States, and since he was my host in his country only six months ago, I want to extend a warm welcome to him and hope that his visit will strengthen the ties between our two countries and give him an understanding of the warmth and goodwill of the people of the U.S. in their relationships to the rest of the world.

I know the King expects to travel in the U.S., and wherever he goes I hope he will be given a warm welcome. He has the hope that the North African countries of Algeria, Tunisia and Morocco may form a bridge between the Arab nations of the Near East and the Western countries, since these nations of North Africa come in much closer contact with the West.

I was much interested to read the other day of a broadcast made by Mr. George F. Kennan for the British Broadcasting Corporation in which he advocated serious consideration by the Western powers of allowing Germany to be neutralized.

This would mean that Germany would have only a police force and, in making this offer, it would be subject to the reunification of East and West Germany.

This plan has been considered before, for there are a number of people, particularly the French, who have some anxiety at allowing the Germans to become a strong military power again. When all is said and done, it is the Germans who were responsible for two European wars, though one might say that this responsibility was never theirs alone, since they were given the hope that they might be successful because of the weakness of their opponents. Without this hope they might not have been willing to start a war.

Having succumbed twice to the lure of winning power through force in such a brief period of time, it is not unnatural that in certain areas fear is expressed at seeing them grow in military power.

The argument on the other side, however, has been that, as part of NATO, their power can be limited and controlled and they will form an efficient first barrier to a possible Soviet aggression in Europe.

This particular argument seems to me not very important in the light of the trend in modern arms. The day may come when the whole of Europe may well be bypassed and a war will be possible directly between the U.S. and the Soviet Union.

Therefore, it seems to me that Mr. Kennan's suggestion to bring about the reunification of Germany, or at least to put the onus of refusing reunification entirely on the Soviet Union, is a rather good one and should be given some serious consideration.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL