My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—Queen Elizabeth's visit to the United States, I think, has done much to eliminate some of the bitterness that resulted when this country allowed the Suez crisis to occur and then said we knew nothing of what our allies were doing.

It always seemed to me that this was a rather lame excuse, since Great Britain and France were our allies and it indicated that our communication must have deteriorated to a point which is not permitted among friends. I hope we will never again indulge in such negligence.

Now that the Queen has done all she can to repair the damage, I hope we will do what we can to restore the warmth of the British-American relationship which is, I think, essential to the strength of the West.

As I looked at the young Queen and her husband, Prince Philip, on their visit to New York, it seemed that she was filling her role with great dignity but also with some weariness. How very young this couple looked—and how we do make our visitors work!

Before going to the Mayor's lunch the Queen shook hands dutifully with a large number of people, all of whom I feel sure she would have enjoyed seeing if she could have been alone with them for just a few minutes. But how one can manage this sort of thing better I have not yet discovered.

The lunch was really a successful party. The ballroom at the Waldorf-Astoria hotel had tables up to the ceiling, the food was excellent and the speeches kept to a minimum. I thought Robert C. Patterson presided well, Mayor Robert F. Wagner spoke well and the Queen's answer was quite perfect.

I wanted to be sure of reaching the United Nations in time to hear the Queen's speech there, and I knew getting across town would probably be complicated, but Bernard Baruch, who took me to the luncheon, took me over to my office and we got through in miraculous fashion. So I picked up my tickets and was in my seat at the U.N. well before 3 p.m.

To my joy, I found Mrs. Jules Mock sitting next to me. I did not know she was here and it was a great pleasure to see her and her husband. I like to go over to the U.N. when there is an opportunity to see a great many of the delegates whom ordinarily I have little chance to meet.

How the Queen got through the day—the U.N. reception, then the enormous dinner and ball—before getting on the plane, I will never quite understand. I am sure she must have flown home feeling the warmth of the people who stood on the sidewalk to greet her and later to bid her goodbye.

It is a good thing to have the Syrian situation discussed in the U.N. I would like to have it come out clearly, as I hope it can, that the U.S. has no desire to dominate the Near East and has done nothing to encourage Turkey to threaten Syria.

If King Saud of Saudi Arabia can help in any way to improve the situation, everyone will be happy. But while at this writing the Turks have accepted, the Syrians, backed by the Soviets, seem to be holding back.

We can hardly complain that the Soviets are now asking for bases in Syria. One might have imagined that that would happen when they first began to give the Syrians military aid.

This is why it seems to me that even at this late date it might be well to consider the suggestion that has come from many quarters that some arrangement be made to stop all shipment of arms from the U.S.S.R. and the U.S. to all countries in the Near East.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL