My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

NEW YORK—In spite of all the going in and out of town I have done in the past several weeks, I still managed to pick up a few threads of the work of the American Association for the United Nations and to see a number of people here.

I began to travel again almost immediately on my return from Russia! First, I spent one night in Hyde Park and then went to Cincinnati, Birmingham, Ala., and Michigan for four speeches, followed by a trip to Rock Island, Ill.

I spent two evenings in New York, looking at some moving pictures of Russia that may become a very interesting film, and seeing a play called "The West Side Story." The music of this play, composed by Leonard Bernstein, forms a wonderful background for what I felt was really a drama and one of intense interest at the present time. In one or two places I would like to see the play changed, but on the whole I found the evening an interesting one.

I was glad to see that the Nobel Peace Prize for 1957 was awarded to Lester B. Pearson, Canada's Minister of State for External Affairs. His leadership in the U.N. has been so outstanding that I think we must all rejoice in its recognition.

Leadership in the U.N. is of great importance to the world, and it does largely depend upon the individual character of the person concerned. It also has been shown many times that it is not always the great countries that furnish the most outstanding leaders.

On the domestic scene, I was glad to see that the Federal government reduced its force in Little Rock, Ark., and released some of the National Guard that had been federalized. I hope this will lessen tensions and perhaps permit Governor Orval Faubus gracefully to climb off the limb on which he put himself and try to work with the President instead of defying the Federal government.

Life has become very complicated for me since I returned from Russia because everyone wants to hear about what goes on in the Soviet Union. Reading is not enough; they want to hear it in words. The number of invitations coming in for speaking engagements, both through my lecture manager, Colston Leigh, and every other possible avenue, are somewhat awe-inspiring, since one cannot create more days in a month.

There was one invitation I was sorry, indeed, not to accept. I was away and could not go to the annual football benefit staged in support of the JCRS—American Medical Center of Denver. This was played yesterday at Yankee Stadium.

For the 26th successive year, the owners of the New York Giants football club had generously set aside large blocks of tickets for this 53-year-old free, nonsectarian institution.

The work of this hospital is unique in that it opens its doors to unfortunate victims of cancer and tuberculosis in all stages. Most hospitals are unwilling to admit or tie up their beds with victims of these dread diseases. The American Medical Center admits these patients without regard to religious preference or need for unlimited hospitalization.

Since proceeds of the game between the Giants and the Pittsburgh Steelers went to further the hospital's medical and research programs, it is easy to see why so many New Yorkers were working in its behalf.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL