My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK—I spent very little time in New York this week, since I went to the city late Sunday evening and Monday morning, bright and early, took the 11 a.m. plane from Idlewild for Miami, Fla.

There I was met by a radio commentator and a photographer, but escaped them quickly and talked with ex-Senator Harry Cain about the television show which we were to do in the evening about the United Nations and the work of the American Association for the United Nations.

My friends, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Gordon, were at the airport to meet me, and as soon as possible we set off to visit an old friend who lives not far away. Then, back to the Gordons' delightful house where I had a rest and time to dress before we went out for dinner.

We were at the TV studio at 8:45, as requested, and the show went on promptly at 9:30. Everyone was very kind afterwards and seemed to think it had gone very well. I was particularly anxious that it should be good, for I was hopeful that the part about the work of the AAUN might be used by our chapters in making our work more easily understood during our yearly membership drive.

There was a reception after the broadcast, but we were home fairly early and I was glad for a good night's sleep before leaving to return to New York on Tuesday morning.

I am always told that Miami is a delightful summer resort. Certainly if you stay indoors, where nearly every place is air-conditioned, you will find whatever temperature you wish. But when you go out into the streets and feel the sun, you know that the weather is really warm. And, I am told, by 10 a.m. even the bathers find the water very warm.

Nevertheless, the big hotels are all open and doing a good business, and so one can no longer call Southern Florida only a winter resort—it is actually a year-round resort. And while I felt it rather humid and too relaxing, my friends tell me that they have quite as much energy there as anywhere else.

Back in New York I had the pleasure of seeing a Protestant bishop from Manila who has built a church and named it in memory of my husband. During the war he organized the chaplain services for the Philippine Islands and was one of those who lived through the "Death March" from Corregidor and was interned with General Jonathan Wainwright. The bishop brought his sister and another lady with him from Manila, and I certainly hope that he has great success in raising what money he needs for his church.

I also saw James A. Wechsler, editor of the New York Post, discussing with him arrangements for a trip to the Soviet Union. In the evening I went to see the Broadway musical, "Bells Are Ringing," a most delightful and pleasant evening's entertainment. Judy Holliday is charming in it, and I thought Sydney Chaplin did his father great credit as a young author. The music is tuneful, the theatre cool and altogether I can recommend this for an enjoyable summer evening.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL