My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—Our poor President! He apparently is in trouble again, this time with his own party!

Because of his big budget, contributions to the Republican party are showing a decline, the chairman of the party's national committee says.

I am sure these party contributors will blame him, too, for the Supreme Court's decision in the du Pont case because the court, to which the President had made enough appointments to change its complexion, didn't behave the way it was expected to behave.

There is no question about it today: Uneasy lies the head that bears the responsibilities of state!

Governments, it seems, are slow to learn.

Kenya, in British East Africa, has gone through a period of revolt which cost the British a good many lives and a great deal of anxiety. Most of the trouble resulted from the fact that the natives woke up to the realization that they were being forced off the fertile land and that this land—their land—was being given to British subjects.

Now it is reported that the Mamatola tribe of South Africa, consisting of 410 families, has been ordered by the Minister of Native Affairs to vacate the slopes of Letsiltel Valley in northeast Transvaal and move to Metz, 30 miles east, where there is a native trust farm in a humid, low veld completely undeveloped without a building or a plowed field.

The land now occupied by the tribe was deeded to it as a permanent home by Stephanus Johnannes Paulis Kruger, president of the Transvaal Republic at the turn of the century, and the tribe already had occupied the valley for more than 100 years.

There the Mamatolas have acres of ripening maze, citrus trees loaded with yellow oranges, and groves of bananas and other tropical fruit.

They must move, the Minister of Native Affairs says, because their poor farming methods are causing soil erosion. Their pleas of protest have been to no avail.

They are being offered only $28 apiece for their holdings, exclusive of crops, whereas the neighboring white farmers are valuing the rich land of the Mamatolas at $300 an acre.

This is the kind of poor, unfair government which is apt to bring about a long, drawn-out era of bad feeling. When will we learn that decent, fair treatment is essential among people of different races and that without it we create only more trouble and more hard feeling?

Everyone, I think, must have been pleased at the announcement that Mr. and Mrs. Clifton Daniel have a baby boy and must have thought particularly of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Truman's joy in this first grandchild.

Somehow I can imagine the pleasure former President Truman will get out of seeing this boy grow up. As a grandfather, he will be a joy to the small boy as well as to the boy's mother and father, for Mr. Truman has a loyalty and devotion to his own which soon will be recognized by his grandson.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL