My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—I think there is a great urgency for people to let their representatives in Congress know if they are in favor of the Atoms for Peace Program.

It was the President's own suggestion that started the idea of developing the peacetime uses of atomic energy for the good of mankind. It took a long while to think it out, but finally 81 nations met here to discuss what kind of an agency should be set up and how it should be related to the U. N. At any other time, this event would have captured the attention of the whole world. But unfortunately both the Near East question and the Hungarian question had taken up everyone's thoughts, so that this meeting of 81 nations drew practically no public attention whatever. As one result, certain members of Congress are now saying that setting up this agency is unnecessary, that it requires too much money, that we are inclined to remain away from other people and not to give them any more secrets which will tie us closer together.

This is the old isolationist approach, and we have some Congressmen who make this plea very often. But I think there is potentially a different sentiment in the country as a whole. If the people knew that this plan was actually under consideration and that we could cooperate with many nations and do so much for human beings, there would be no question but what we would tell our representatives that such an agency must be set up and that we must be members of it. I hope very much that those who read my column will have enough conviction about the value of this peaceful development to write their representatives immediately that they wish to be a part of it.

In the American Association for the U.N. we believe strongly that our collegiate councils for the U.N. can play a very important role in educating young people to an understanding of the work of the U.N. The time is approaching when these young people come together in our CCUN institute at Finch College from June 16 to 22. No matter whether or not you belong to a collegiate council, you can come to this meeting if you apply to the Collegiate Council for the U.N., 345 East 46th Street, New York 17, N.Y., pay a registration fee of $10.00, and are accepted by the committee in charge. If you want to come, however, you should apply at once, because registration time has already passed. I have not thought to tell you about this meeting before, for which I am rather sorry, as two people have told me of their interest in the past few days.

When you register on June 16, you will have to pay $40.00 for room and board during the week which begins on Sunday and ends on Saturday afternoon. You must also have enough to pay small expenses like local carfare and three meals away from Finch College. All students must live at Finch College and will be taken care of except for the three meals mentioned.

If you are interested in the U.N., whether you belong to a collegiate council or not, you will find this a most rewarding week.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL