My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HOUSTON—I am in Texas for two lectures on behalf of Bonds for Israel and arrived in Houston when a court hearing was being held on the speed for compliance with the Supreme Court's order on desegregation of schools.

This led the press to ask me a number of questions which, as a guest, I felt it was unfortunate for me to have to answer, particularly since I feel that my attitude and beliefs on this question have been so well known.

I was glad, however, to be able to express my strong feelings against violence in this issue anywhere in our country. And so I regret the decision made in Texas against the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, for it seems to take away the right to use legal action to enforce the desegregation decision and, in a way, makes it more difficult to prevent violence.

I hope that I am wrong and that we will see a continuation of the staunchness shown by the citizens in Montgomery, Ala., who under the leadership of the Rev. Martin Luther King have adhered to non-violence.

But human beings have a breaking point if denied an outlet for their emotions and convictions. Then violence may seem to be the only answer, and that hurts us, both at home and abroad.

On my way here I went through Midland, Tex., to visit my granddaughter, Mrs. Henry Lindsley III. She is the former Chandler Roosevelt, daughter of my son, Elliott.

About a year ago I attended her wedding and I was interested to see her as a housekeeper in her new home. She always was a perfectionist and her home shows it. Everything was in absolute order and she has neglected none of the little touches that make a home charming and livable.

There were flowers everywhere. Chandler and her husband have two dogs and they complain bitterly that the pets have made it impossible for them to have a more successful garden.

This young couple gives one the feeling of having mutual interests and of wanting to grow in their interests to understand world situations, which is quite remarkable for people of their age.

Midland is a town where, I think, the average age certainly is under 35. There are many children and the town is growing because of the oil industry, which is the major business interest for everyone living there. I know nothing about the oil industry, but I tried to learn a little from my grandchildren. And I liked what they told me about their friends and the town they live in.

Before flying here from New York I spent a day in upstate Syracuse, where I spoke for a branch of the NAACP. The branch there is not too strong, but it had an extremely good meeting in which the National Council of Negro Women and other groups joined in a discussion of discrimination against the Negro in this country.

I also had the joy of lunching and having dinner with my daughter and her husband, Dr. and Mrs. James Halsted. My return plane was late and I did not arrive back in New York City until 1:30 a.m., but it was such a pleasant day that the extra hours were not burdensome.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL