My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—I have been home now for several days, but before taking a night plane from Paris to New York I caught up a little on the news and now will begin to think more of contemporary happenings. But I shall not be able to get the people I saw in Austria out of my mind.

My two preoccupations at the moment are these European refugees and the people I saw on my recent trip to Morocco. The latter must receive some of our surplus supplies or both they and the animals of that newly-free North African state soon will be dying of hunger.

Before leaving Salzburg, Austria, we spent a night in a most beautiful castle converted into a hotel and called Castle Fuschl. It is situated part way up a mountain, with mountains in back of it and all around the lake on which I looked down from my windows.

The view was unbelievably beautiful, and on my arrival I looked out and saw an almost full moon reflected in the water. And in the morning sun, the view was equally lovely. It will be one of the places in the world I always shall remember and hope to revisit.

The Governor of Salzburg dined with us that evening, and after dinner a gentleman who teaches old Austrian songs to young boys brought them in to sing. This teacher is a specialist in Austrian history, and I was told he has made studies of customs and habits of the area and was trying to keep them alive.

We certainly enjoyed the boys' singing, and then I found a good night's sleep was very pleasant and I was ready the next morning for the lonely drive back to Munich, from where we took a plane to Paris.

I am delighted to note there is a "cautious optimism" that some agreements may be reached between the Soviets and ourselves in the London disarmament talks.

I always have felt strongly that we should stop nuclear tests altogether. And, of course, if we stop the tests, the next step is to come to an agreement on doing away with nuclear weapons. But we cannot do this without an agreement with the Soviets for a reduction all along the line to bring the total arms strength to greater equality.

Our Southwest seems to have had more than its share of bad weather. After a drought, there were floods and now a tornado leaving death and destruction in its wake. Everyone must sympathize with the poor people who go through these terrible ordeals.

Election of Dr. Philip C. Jessup as president of the Woodrow Wilson Foundation was pleasing to me, for he is well-fitted to carry out the purposes which Woodrow Wilson would have liked to see aided through his foundation.

A dinner was given in New Jersey Thursday evening to celebrate Mrs. Lewis Thompson's 85th birthday anniversary. Everyone was in a happy mood, for Mrs. Thompson is a much-loved and admired citizen of that state.

But the evening was clouded by the fact that the chairman of the dinner, Reeve Schley, had a slight stroke and was unable to attend. News of his recovery seems to be encouraging and I only hope he will be well soon again.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL