My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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GLASGOW, Scotland—Another organization in the United Kingdom is doing a remarkable piece of work helping handicapped girls who have never been trained to earn their living. These girls suffer from disabilities resulting from infantile paralysis, paraplegia, asthma, heart trouble, rheumatoid arthritis or osteomyelitis.

They live in a home which has been established as a school and is supported by private funds. These girls learn to do the most exquisite needlework.

On my visit there before coming to Glasgow I found, among other things, some little smocks which I could not resist buying for some of my youngest grandchildren. It is always pleasant to feel that what you get will provide pleasure, but if in getting it you also feel you are helping someone who really needs to earn a living, it is doubly satisfactory.

Also before we left for Glasgow, M. and Mme. Jules Moch, the French delegates to the London disarmament conference, and Hector Bolitho, the English author, came to see us before dinner. Dining with us were Mr. and Mrs. Tom Matthews and Sir Arthur Willert, my husband's old friend, and it was hard to tear ourselves away in time to make the train for Glasgow.

The trip to Glasgow was very comfortable. I really like the British railroad trains, and I particularly enjoyed being able to open my window, something which is never possible in the United States. So I awoke feeling much more refreshed than usual after a night on a train.

We had been warned that it would be very cold in Scotland at this season and were told that snow fell only a few days ago. But the countryside looked lovely to me. And Glasgow, which I do not think is one of the most beautiful cities in the world, looked attractive and very up-to-date as we drove by the many shops.

Glasgow always has been an industrial center, and on my last trip here in 1942 during the war I visited one of the largest industries down the Clyde where shipbuilding is concentrated and where workers' homes on each side of the river had been destroyed by bombing, just as they had been along the Thames.

Now many of the scars of war have been at least covered up, just as they have been in other parts of the British Isles. But if you look carefully you can see where destruction made new building necessary.

In London the other day I saw the site of our new embassy offices on Grosvenor Square. It certainly will be a great advantage to have them all under one roof. Now they are scattered in several buildings that were built for apartments, necessitating much rearrangement and discomfort.

Even here in Glasgow they are troubled by foreign attaches who try to organize anti-Western propaganda, and in London a Romanian attache who has been there since 1951 is being asked to leave because he was trying to induce Romanian refugees with relatives in Romania to broadcast entirely false information on life in Great Britain.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL