My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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GLASGOW, Scotland—My last day in London was a busy one which began when I joined Lady Mountbatten, who is head of the Save the Children Fund, at a preview at Christies of an auction to be given later.

All of the things to be auctioned are donated by persons interested in the Save the Children Fund or Youth Aliyah, a Jewish children's refugee organization. These two organizations work together and, from the people interested in both, beautiful things are collected for sale. Shops as well as individuals make donations.

An interesting scroll, given by Lord Balfour, was contained in a silver case which, in turn, was in another beautiful wooden case. He gave it to be auctioned off to someone who would donate it to a museum. Mr. Woolfson* paid 250 pounds sterling for this scroll and will give it to a museum in Israel.

There were some lovely prints and paintings, as well as carvings and silver pieces. At the end of the preview Sir Alex Martin took us into his room so we could drink champagne to the success of the auction.

From there I went to a movie theatre to see a film made of a book I wrote about earlier in the year called "Children of the Shadows." Here, the book is coming out under the name of "Children of the Sun," by Morris West. The film will be shown to the public here very soon and later, I hope, in New York.

I think the first name under which I read the book's galley proofs was more descriptive than the present one. And the movie's portrayal of the little priest as a big, strong man is not quite real, for while he is strong and belligerent, he is very short and small.

This film should reach the United States about August. How successful it will be cannot yet be determined, but I hope it will stir in the minds of those who see it a desire to see something done to modify our immigration laws.

In the movie, the problems of the little priest are solved through the time of apprenticeship of his boys. But the boys become unemployed once their apprenticeship is over, and then where are they to turn?

With a revision of our immigration laws, we might get a quota for some of these boys who have been rescued from a life of crime, trained to live decently and to earn their way, then cannot find an outlet for their skills in Naples, Italy.

I had the pleasure of lunching with Mrs. Pandit, and after lunch we drove around Grosvenor Square, as I felt I wanted to see the statue of my husband there. I spent an hour and a half with the workers of Youth Aliyah.

In all of these countries where money is raised for needy Jewish children there are thousands of workers who never come in touch with the children themselves, so they do not have the satisfaction of seeing the results of their work. I was happy to have the chance to tell them something of what I had seen which, I hope, will add to their sense of accomplishment.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL

*Possibly Mr. Wolfson