My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—There was hope in yesterday's news which lifted up all our hearts when Israel announced in the United Nations she had agreed to withdraw from the Gaza Strip and Gulf of Aqaba areas if the U.N. would take over.

This agreement, I think, is basic to final peace in that area of the world. It took hard and long negotiations, but I think it proved that people of goodwill can come to agreements even when the most vital issues are involved.

Egypt, however, attacked the United States in the General Assembly the previous day over what it called the "Israel deal." Now, it is hoped that Egypt will have enough sense to comply with the withdrawal agreement terms.

I was happy to be able to attend a concert of the Philharmonic-Symphony, conducted by Bruno Walter and featuring pianist Myra Hess, in Carnegie Hall last week.

It was an all-Beethoven concert, and seldom have I heard the Fourth Piano Concerto played more beautifully. Myra Hess is so restrained, so modest, and yet such a finished artist that she brings out every note with complete clarity. Her artistry brought an ovation from the capacity audience.

At intermission, she presented a token of esteem to Bruno Walter, who is curtailing his activities at the end of this season. Mr. Walter is 80 years old, but you certainly would not know it, for as a conductor he seems full of vigor and controls the orchestra completely.

I do not have the opportunity to attend as many concerts as I would like. They are my favorite form of entertainment, for when the world is as disturbed as it is today, music is one of the great factors in restoring peace to the soul.

A clipping I received in a letter tells of the Eastern Paralyzed Veterans Association's immediate need for help.

This organization was founded 10 years ago by seven World War II veterans who had come out of hospitals in wheelchairs but felt sure they would be able to earn a living. They were joined by 500 paraplegic veterans in the New York area in organizing the association.

They succeeded in getting jobs and finding apartments without steps. The organization prospered, founded a newspaper and a credit union, provided funds for legal aid, second-hand wheelchairs and death benefits.

But today these victims of World War II are all but forgotten. The association now has 1,000 paraplegics needing help, but it is not getting public support. An appeal was made for $30,000 and only $900 was received in response.

A little from a great many of us would do the trick. Perhaps we can picture how we ourselves would feel being confined to a wheelchair, and we should go on giving, both at home and abroad, wherever there is need.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL