My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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SAN FRANCISCO—Snow in Spokane, more snow in Tacoma! We really have been seeing winter weather and flying under what must be difficult conditions for the airline pilots, for the ceiling was not too high, either on landing or on takeoff in either of these places.

Driving has not been too easy, either, and that made me wonder if we would have a very good meeting in Tacoma, Wash., Tuesday night.

The affair there began with a press conference and a reception, both well attended, and the evening meeting was attended by an almost capacity audience. The capacity is 1,300 people in the auditorium of Pacific Lutheran College, so I gather that there were more than 1,000 present in spite of the snow, which was the wet kind and made driving difficult.

All we saw of the scenery on the flight from Tacoma to San Francisco Wednesday was one little snow-capped peak sticking above the clouds. But when we reached San Francisco, instead of rain and clouds, the sun was shining and the clouds had more or less disappeared.

The banner headline across the front page of the paper Wednesday was, of course, on the news that Grace Kelly has a baby girl. It must have been a disappointment to her, for in European royal or semi-royal families of this kind, a son is a very important arrival but a daughter is of little interest.

One really important bit of news that I found in the newspaper was the Supreme Court's decision that the Taft-Hartley Act permits a strike after a 60-day notice during the life of a union-management contract which is subject to reopening.

This is a reversal of the decision of the Court of Appeals in St. Louis which had ruled that the law flatly bans strikes to obtain modifications of a contract until the contract has been terminated by its terms or action of the parties to it.

This has particular importance because there seems to be a trend among the unions and employers to enter into agreements of longer duration than they have before, but to include provisions for reopening to negotiate changes during the contract's life. This is an important decision for labor, and as longer contracts are desirable, I think the decision will add to stability.

Poland's voting processes, as described in the newspaper here, sound complicated. But the people there seem to have succeeded in registering their real desires.

The leader of Poland's independence-slanted Communists scored an overwhelming victory for the National Front ticket. And Gomulka's Communist party came out of last Sunday's elections with 236 seats in Parliament, only six more than a bare majority, but these are still not official and complete returns.

The general trend, however, would seem to be toward such people as want more nationalism and freedom. There is only one ticket, which is the National Front, but more candidates run than there are seats to be filled, so this means that the voter is allowed a slight choice.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL