My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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MIAMI—The American Book Company has published a little pamphlet by Pearl Farmer Richardson, vice-chairman of the Speakers Research Committee for the United Nations, entitled "Your Community U.N." It gives briefly and simply the story of the U.N. and tries to make people compare their own community with the structure, conditions and objectives of the U.N. Here is one paragraph that describes the idea:

"Just as the U.N. pattern is an intelligent way of coordinating the good forces in the world, so it is also the pattern for the intelligent coordination of the good forces in any community. It is a positive program with definite action, action with a purpose, and that purpose the betterment of conditions for the local community as a part of the world community."

It is interesting to look at your own community with the parallel of the world community in mind. We must find out how many races are represented, what the community problems are, and how they can be handled.

If you think of the charter of the U.N., you will agree perhaps with another statement in this booklet which says:

"The charter of the U.N. is in reality an amplification of the admonition mankind was given centuries ago, 'Therefore all things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye even so to them.'

"Some version of the Golden Rule runs through all the great religions. The Golden Rule in action will make and keep the peace. This is the simplest way the charter of the U.N. can be stated."

And perhaps it is also the simplest way by which you can solve many of the problems in your own community. In the survey that you will make of your own community, if you really study all of your community's problems, you will find it is the same survey you will want to make of all the nations in the world when you become interested in their problems.

For instance, what are the educational facilities of your area, what religious groups are represented, what industries have you, what must you import and what can you export, what are your transportation and communication facilities, what are the civil and philanthropic organizations on which you can call to help you face your problems and find solutions?

This is pretty much what the U.N. is doing in countries all over the world. Getting the answers to these questions and trying to face the problems of the world and find solutions for them is a bigger task, but it is one we can all understand if we think of our own community in relation to the larger problem.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL