My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON—The National Education Association, which will observe its centennial in 1957, is planning a very extensive program. Among a number of projects planned one of the first is a suggestion to hold meetings during the coming year on various subjects important to education. As revealed in a newly published NEA leaflet entitled, "To Consider Education In A Changing World," the topics chosen for discussion are (1) Manpower Shortage in Education, (2) Our School Board at Work, (3) Education for Leisure, (4) School Buildings for Today, (5) Education for Safe Living, (6) Discipline for Today's Children, (7) A School Program for Today.

These subjects are all covered at some length in the leaflet and, of course, more information can be obtained when needed. Also provided is a list of reading material that will help anyone to clarify his mind on these various subjects.

One of the interesting questions suggested for discussion is: "How Can Our Organization Help in Teacher Recruitment? Or, How Can We Help in Attracting and Holding Good Teachers in Our Own Community If Turnover Is High?"

The NEA suggests that there are practical ways in which communities can help to meet some of the difficulties that challenge education today. For instance, we are not sure at all that we are using to the maximum all the abilities that our young people have, for we have not yet made it possible for all young people to acquire whatever education they are able to take regardless of their financial situation at home. This is one of the deterrents to the maximum use of our young people's abilities.

Another is the question of obtaining for our young people the most-stimulating kind of education in high school, so they will want to go on and acquire the best kind of education in college. This means strengthening our teacher training institutions, not allowing them to forget that to have children not go on to college who have the capacity for continued learning is a failure on the part of the teacher as much as it is a failure on the part of the family or the child.

We have not given enough thought to the waste of our young people's abilities. We all know that we have frequently allowed such a waste in this country and that is one of the things I think the NEA centennial celebration will bring before the public.

On April 4, 1957, some 6,000 local education associations throughout the U.S. will hold birthday celebrations to commemorate the founding of NEA and the growth and development of education in their respective communities. At these meetings it will be suggested that local meetings of many organizations set aside the "teachers' minute," during which a salute will be given to the members of any organization of teachers because of their contribution to the advancement of education.

This is a good idea and every community could take it up.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL