My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON—Leonard Bernstein conducted the Philharmonic Symphony in Handel's "The Messiah" last Sunday. It was a most inspiring and beautiful concert. He arranged it, I imagine, to fit into the time of year and to use his singers to the best advantage. I thought Adele Addison, the soprano, performed beautifully and, all in all, it was a delightful afternoon.

On New Year's Eve some of us went to the New York City Center to see the ballet. The first number, "Serenade," with music by Tchaikovsky, was a classic ballet and not particularly interesting, but I was very much interested by Samuel Barber's "Souvenirs" and the following two numbers, "Pas de Dix" and the "Western Symphony," sustained the high level of the second number.

It was a feat, I felt, to produce this "Western Symphony" and Hershey Kay did, I think, a most interesting piece of work. Both of these entertainments were enjoyable and I can recommend them to all my friends.

I was saddened to read in the paper of Vice Admiral Wilson Brown's death. He was with my husband for a long time and my husband was very fond of him.

He retired in 1945 and lived in Waterford, Conn., where I had the pleasure of visiting Mrs. Brown and the Admiral some years ago. He certainly had an active and interesting career and was highly valued by everyone with whom he served.

It must be a consolation when the evening of life draws near to look back on so many accomplishments, and I know Admiral Brown enjoyed his home in Waterford and was a valued member of that community.

To preserve the love of family and friends, and the respect and admiration of those with whom one has worked, is to end a life of service in this world with flags flying and a sense of a complete life.

The 85th Congress opened yesterday and, as its leaders, we will find Senator Lyndon B. Johnson, Speaker Sam Rayburn, Senator William F. Knowland and Congressman Joseph W. Martin Jr. all in their accustomed positions.

I wish that it were possible to make some changes in committee chairmen for I think we are very vulnerable when we have as chairman of our Senate Judiciary Committee a gentleman who has openly stated that a Supreme Court order should not be obeyed in his state.

It must seem strange, indeed, to other nations that we cannot get rid, because of the seniority rule, of the head of this committee who is out of sympathy with the highest lawmaking body in his own country.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL