My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

NEW YORK—I spent a long evening on Wednesday with the gentlemen and ladies who write news for the whole world. I attended with three friends the third International Press Ball of the Foreign Press Association at the Waldorf Astoria.

It was for the benefit of the United Nations Children's Fund and the New York Herald Tribune Fresh Air Fund, so representatives of the U.N. and the Herald Tribune were present. Mayor Robert F. Wagner made a delightful short speech of welcome and Cornelia Otis Skinner presided over the introduction of the artists, who gave a really remarkable program.

The artists were kind enough to come and appear between their own shows or when work on their shows was finished. Therefore, the evening's entertainment started late, but I found it very pleasant. I enjoyed watching the people and talking with my neighbors as well as being entertained by world-famous artists.

I kept thinking that these gentlemen and ladies at all the tables around me were writing information for all corners of the world and what they wrote would have great effect on the thinking of vast numbers of people.

The power yielded by the pen, as represented in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf that night, was quite overwhelming and I only hope that it is exercised with goodwill toward men in general.

I had the pleasure of sitting at the table with the leader of the French delegation now in charge of the permanent U.N. delegation in New York. I think he is making every effort to revive the somewhat damaged relations between our two countries, and I hope he will be successful.

I did not have an opportunity to tell you of a proclamation issued by the office of the Mayor of New York City which inaugurated the Actors Fund of America Week.

The actors are going through the theatres on their annual public breadbasket appeal between December 21 and January 1. They have always raised a substantial amount for the Actors Fund of America.

The fund was established in 1882 and has helped the aged, sick and destitute of the theatrical profession for the past 74 years. It was one of John Golden's great interests.

Before attending the luncheon given by the Actors Fund on December 21, I went to the ceremonies for the unveiling of a plaque which the fund has placed on the John Golden Theatre on 45th Street. I was glad to see this memorial put up to recall John Golden's association with the Broadway theatre, which he loved so dearly, many years after all of us who knew him have followed him into the great beyond.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL