My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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ATLANTA—I heard from my old friend, Dr. Martha Eliot, the other day that as of January 1, 1957 she is leaving as chief of the U.S. Children's Bureau in Washington to accept a professorship of maternal and child health in the Harvard School of Public Health.

All of us who have watched the growth of the Children's Bureau and its activities over the years were happy to hear that she accepted the post but were sorry, too, to see her go. I can well understand, however, that this appointment at Harvard may give her a broader field of influence and I wish her success and happiness in her new work.

We left Welland, Ontario, Tuesday night by train for Chicago. I entirely forgot that the time would change an hour on our trip and as a result I was dressed and ready to get off the train an hour ahead of time.

This gave us time, however, to go into the diner for breakfast. I happened to sit with a gentleman there who was returning from a visit to New York state on business.

Looking happily out of the window at the nice flat landscape, he remarked, "It does look good. Coming home is always the nicest part of any trip."

This convinced me again that the average American likes his own locality, devoid as it may be of scenic beauty, better than any other part of the world.

This man told me that he had driven along the Thruway in New York state with an area manager for his company. He thought the state was very beautiful in spots, but you could tell that it didn't compare with his Midwest fields. This kind of loyalty is good, but it may keep people from seeing the beauties of other places, let alone really enjoying them.

We changed trains in Chicago and went out on the train which reached Milwaukee a little after 11 a.m. Milwaukee is a friendly and pleasant city, and I was greeted warmly by the people who were having the dinner at which I spoke Wednesday night. After a press conference and small luncheon, I had a chance to talk with a young friend of mine, Mrs. Pauline Redmond Coggs.

In Milwaukee I was told of a project in Germany established by the Fraternal Order of Eagles in cooperation with CARE and the West Berlin municipal government for the benefit of West Berlin youth.

Several years ago Ernest Reuter, mayor of Berlin, visited the United States and in Milwaukee met Judge Robert W. Hansen of the District Court who was a national leader of the Eagles and had been its national president. The two men discussed an international project to teach German youth the meaning of democracy and their discussion bore fruit in 1953, when Eaglehaus was established.

West Berlin authorities provided money for setting up this school, the Eagles supplied several thousand dollars for a clubhouse and other facilities, and CARE distributed a carpenter's apprentice kit to every Eaglehaus student. The kits were provided by the Eagles.

The school has a well-rounded basic educational program and teaches carpentry as its principal craft. Although most of the 700 students are boys, several girls have been admitted. The school is not a government undertaking and it is run entirely by American organizations for the benefit of the German youth.

The old castle which houses the school once was a fortress in which political prisoners were kept, so perhaps it is particularly appropriate that it now should be used to house those teaching democracy to the youth of Germany.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL