My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

WILMINGTON, Del.—I have been campaigning so actively that it seemed almost strange to go back to my regular work for the American Association for the United Nations in my journey up to Vermont on Monday as a part of the association's United Nations Week celebration.

The transition was not as difficult as I thought it might be, however, and I found myself enjoying a non-political meeting of high school children in the afternoon and a large rally at the Bradford, Vt., High School in the evening.

The weather had not been kind. I waited three hours before my plane got off in the morning and I had to return on a night train instead of flying.

I went to Barnard College at noon Tuesday to speak at a political assembly, where Attorney General Jacob K. Javits, Republican candidate to the U.S. Senate from New York state, also spoke.

It was amusing to read of the strong plea to remove the Israel issue from politics made by Javits at a dinner in memory of Louis D. Brandeis, former justice of the U.S. Supreme Court.

How the Israel issue might be divorced from politics at the present time I find it difficult to envision, for what happened on this problem before 1953 certainly will be attributed to the Democrats and what happened since, to the Republicans.

I don't think either the Democrats or the Republicans can claim a clean bill of health for wisdom and courage in our policy toward Israel. For there always has been a group of career men in our State Department that honestly believes it is more important, at any cost, for us to stay on the side of the Arab nations because of the importance of oil interests in those countries to Great Britain and the United States.

The question of what really is right or wrong, I believe, hardly enters into their thinking. It is traditional to remain friendly to the Arab nations because of these oil interests; everything else is secondary. So, whichever political party has been in power, these influences have been paramount in the State Department.

It is not a case of partisan policy but rather a strong desire to keep oil on its way to Great Britain and the United States from the Near East. All decisions have been colored by this interest.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL