My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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CLEVELAND—There has come to me in the mail a rather interesting proposition for "Peace in Progress." It is inspired by President Eisenhower's address at Baylor University last Commencement Day.

He proposed that "America's great universities help the needy free nations set up science education centers in an effort to promote world peace." It goes on to explain that more recently the President said he would like an American steamship to show the American products around the world.

From these two thoughts, this project of "Peace in Progress" was developed. The idea is that the government should recondition one of the big steamships now in mothballs, that American manufacturers should establish scholarships of a minimum of $3,000 and provide additional fees for the display and demonstration on the ship at ports of call of the goods of the manufacturer.

Organizations and individuals also would be permitted to sponsor scholarships and America's great accredited universities (944 in number) would be asked to name a man and a woman, preferably in graduate standing, with high achievement to further their studies on this educational cruise. They would go around the world, dividing the time into two semesters.

The students would be allowed time for sightseeing in and around the ports of call, and the ship's exhibits would be opened for one or two or three days, as seemed advisable, in each port.

"Peace in Progress" is proposed as a government enterprise and national defense plan to promote international understanding and world peace and is called "a vital activity and will stimulate tremendous force for friendly international relations."

The plan has, of course, been worked out in far more detail than I give you here, and its sponsors have asked me to tell them to whom they might apply in the Government for consideration of the program.

As it is actually based on the President's suggestions, I think he is the one who should be approached, although the Department of Commerce should have a deep interest in this plan.

After finally leaving Charleston, W. Va., on our campaign and lecture trip, we found ourselves, before long, in clear weather. We stopped in Akron and Cleveland, Ohio, and finally arrived in Detroit.

Immediately on arrival at the hotel there was a press conference. A charming young lady came to greet me for the Americans for Democratic Action, and then all was peace and quiet for nearly an hour and a half. I had one or two interviews and attended a dinner before going to speak at a rally in the evening.

When this was over, we flew to Marquette, Mich. This was one of my regular lecture engagements for which I had signed a contract some time ago. I spoke for the Northern Michigan College of Education in the morning on "Changes in the Past 50 Years," attended an early lunch and left by plane at 1 p.m. for Chicago.

We caught another plane to New York, where I attended several meetings with Adlai Stevenson, and then took a plane back to Chicago to fill a lecture engagement for which I had signed a contract before undertaking any campaigning. This was a lecture in Ashland, Wis.

On Friday I took the night train into Chicago. There I went back to my political role and attended three meetings, finally taking a late plane to New York so as to have a quiet day at home on Sunday.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL