My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—Friday, being the busiest day on my trip, was, of course, the one that began with trouble. I was up at 6:30 a.m. and left the hotel at 7:45 a.m. for the airport.

We reached the airport in ample time, but we were greeted by the charming young lady who always brings me bad news at the San Francisco airport. She said our plane had blown a fuse, or something similar, and we would be delayed at least an hour. When you are running a tight schedule, this is a near-catastrophe.

There was much telephoning and rearrangement of plans in Los Angeles. In the meantime, my efficient young lady tried to get us on another plane. We finally got off a little after 10 a.m., arriving in Los Angeles about 12 noon. Anyone who knows this far-flung city realizes that the trip from the airport to the Beverly Hilton Hotel takes a good half hour. So, fortunately, the press conference had been put off.

I went directly to a lunch where money was being raised for the Democratic campaign. Our host was most generous and told his guests that whatever was pledged or raised for the campaign, he and his wife would match.

This generous offer made it possible for him to needle all persons in the room by telling them they must be more generous in spending their money.

I gather that the lunch was a success. But I had no time to really find out because I was whisked away and driven some 20 minutes on winding roads, up and down canyons, to a charming home where Democratic women were holding a rally. There, the press awaited me with cameras, and movies, and lights—the kind that make you warm—and it was warm enough already in Los Angeles. In fact, I had gone back to summer clothes!

The press conference was spirited. We dealt with Mr. Nixon and the Democratic trend spreading over the country. And then I went to speak to the ladies gathered on the sunny lawn, and I marveled that they had the courage to stay and listen to anyone talk when it was so warm. But they were enthusiastic and seemed to be ready to go out and work.

Then I went to CBS to introduce Adlai Stevenson in his television speech from Milwaukee. After that I was taken by plane to San Diego for a speech, then flown back to Los Angeles in time to take the 11 p.m. plane to New York.

And so ends my first campaign trip in this campaign. Active but satisfactory—and I hope beneficial to the Democratic party. In any case, the enthusiasm and willingness to work shown by Democrats give me confidence that we will win on November 6.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL