My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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MEEKER, Colo.—I drove up to my Hyde Park, N.Y., home early last Saturday morning and had the pleasure of entertaining at a picnic about 70 people from the permanent delegations to the United Nations.

There was no sun and I was very much afraid we were going to have rain. Fortunately, it held off until everybody started to visit the big house and the library.

I gave my guests a completely American picnic, with baked beans and hot dogs, salad, and apple and pumpkin pie. We had a big fire in the outdoor fireplace and I noticed a number of people gathered rather close to it. I was glad we had not planned this party for a later date, for my guests would certainly have suffered from the cold!

I was able to sort some books and go over a large number of photographs which were damaged when stored in our flooded cellar last year. And so when I went back to New York for a late dinner, I felt I had done a good day's work.

I spent Sunday quietly in New York and I must say I enjoy the emptiness of the city streets on Sunday. One can walk—or if one is fortunate enough to get a taxi—to his destination in record time.

I have found that reading all I want to read in the Sunday newspapers takes practically two hours. I am afraid I skim a good deal and only read an article here and there, but they are so voluminous that this is the only way to get through them.

Someone told me not long ago that he kept his Sunday papers and read them all through the week, but I am afraid that would not be for me.

I have just read a little play written by an Englishman on the destruction of Lidice by the Nazis. I don't know if it will ever be produced, but it dramatizes an incident that nobody certainly should ever forget, for it shows up the cruelty of man to man that is developed by war.

We are nearing the time when everybody will be bending their efforts to get as full a voter registration as possible, because unless we are registered, we cannot vote on Election Day.

It seems to me that the least a citizen of a democracy can do is to vote and, therefore, this duty of registration should not require personal visits by party workers to every house, asking people if they would please go and register.

This obligation should be in everybody's mind and everyone should see that this civic duty is performed.

This goes for voters of all parties, for, while I am a Democrat, I think we want to preserve the two-party system and we want to get the best out of it that we possibly can. We cannot do that unless both parties have full registration and get their people to feel the responsibility to carry out their obligation to their government.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL