My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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COPENHAGEN, Denmark—The European edition of the New York Herald Tribune stated on Wednesday that 17 nations out of the 22 gathered in London lined up solidly and unequivocally behind an amended version of Secretary of State John Foster Dulles' plan for establishing an international control board to operate the Suez Canal. The Foreign Minister of Pakistan seems to have been responsible for the amendments, which were accepted by all except Ceylon, Spain, the Soviet Union and India.

Indonesia, while lining up with them, was rather tentative. What will happen now must still be defined by an international agreement, so we are not yet at the end of our difficulties there.

The Republican Convention delegates, we are told, proposed tax relief for low and middle incomes. I wonder if they will really take it out of big corporations or not.

I cannot help regretting that Senator Herbert Lehman has decided not to run for election to the Senate this coming autumn. I know that for him and for his devoted wife it will be a relief and a lifting of a burden which he is well entitled to lay aside as a citizen. However, I hate to see the conscience of the Senate leave that body.

Every year Senator Lehman has been there he has grown in stature until his influence has been very great. All of us owe him a deep debt of gratitude. I personally wish him long years in which to enjoy a way of life of his own choosing and I hope he will continue to give us the benefit of his wisdom and leadership as a citizen during the years to come.

I visited the royal Copenhagen ware stores after lunch and am now preparing to take my two grandsons this evening to dine at Tivoli and leave them there to find an evening of entertainment while the ambassador takes me to speak for a group of women's organizations.

On Thursday morning we were taken, first of all, to call on the Minister of Agriculture. He and his wife were going with us on a tour of the countryside to see three different-sized farms.

One of these was a small, 16-acre farm where practically no outside labor is used except during a few days a year. The man and his wife and the children run the farm. Then we went to see a 100-acre farm and a large estate about half in woodland and half under cultivation.

Both the farm and the farm homes are of great interest to me. The woman on the small farm had in the kitchen an old-fashioned wood stove which also burned peat. But, in addition, she had a small gas stove. There was electricity, but no plumbing.

She assured me, however, that they were going to have a bathroom, and when a woman says that with determination, she usually achieves her desire. She had a very good garden and a certain amount of land was set aside for the children's garden. The family had a boy and two girls.

The farmer was invited to the lunch given at the large estate but was unable to go because he needed to harvest.

Everything is carefully planned on these farms—so many cows, so many chickens, etc., according to the size of the farm, and the milk is largely used for butter.

The secret of the success of the smaller farms is the highly developed system of Danish cooperatives. Two small farms use the same tractor. They buy and they sell on a cooperative basis and they have many other advantages achieved through this system.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL