My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK—Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Lash, their son, Jonathan, and I left Hyde Park on Sunday morning, going down to New York in time so that I could go out to Atlantic City to attend an evening meeting. The only way this could be done was by motoring. And it was not a very pleasant day, but the cool air which came with the rain certainly was a relief.

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It is nice that Senator Estes Kefauver and Adlai Stevenson both can be so pleasant about their recent primary campaign difficulties!

Senator Kefauver says he got angry and lost his head but still thinks Stevenson a fine man and would support him wholeheartedly if he should win the nomination.

Stevenson is pleased with this attitude and says he is sure it "will help immeasurably to restore unity to our party and strength to our common cause."

When two persons who have been opposed to each other can be as objective as this, it looks as though there really might be enough unity in the Democratic party to win an election. And that is an end which, naturally, I am anxious to see accomplished.

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It seems to me that the current news of greatest interest is the change in the foreign ministry in Israel. Mrs. Golda Meyerson, the newly-appointed foreign minister, is a staunch supporter of Premier David Ben-Gurion, but I think she also has firm convictions of her own.

Her predecessor, Moshe Sharett, is from my point of view a very astute and fine diplomat as well as a fine man, and I am sure that his country can use his services in some capacity.

One can only hope that the change may in some way be helpful, bringing about more understanding and cooperation because of the long friendship that has existed between Mrs. Meyerson and the Premier.

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It is unfortunate that even in the Senate the voting seems to show a willingness to cut down on foreign aid. If we would cut down on military aid and, instead of decreasing the actual amount, put more into economic aid, I think we could acquire many friends in other countries of the world.

Instead of cutting down on our Point IV program and on our participation in economic aid through the United Nations, we should be insisting on greater efficiency and value in what we spend, so that it would bring about results which we could feel were beneficial to the free world.

I am sure that some of the Democrats opposing the present bill realize quite well that economic aid could be very valuable if properly administered.

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I spent a busy time part of Monday in New York.

I attended a luncheon given by the Secretary General of the U.N. to report on my particular small angle of the Hospitality Committee's work carried on under the direction of Ambassador Patterson.

Then I returned to Hyde Park in time to welcome Mr. K. Ozuomba Mbadiwe, Nigerian Minister of Communications and Aviation, whom I knew years ago as a student in this country.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL