My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—After spending a little time at the office last Wednesday morning, I took the plane to New Bedford, Mass., and motored from there to Fall River, where I attended a cocktail party and dinner at which I spoke.

Ours is certainly a growing country! Everywhere you go there is building going on, and I am impressed by the rapid growth of these towns in New England. At the New Bedford airport I was pleased to see my cousin, Jim Houghteling and his wife and little boy. Summer has really begun and they are there enjoying the beaches and the summer life.

On Thursday I went to New Haven for a meeting of the Service Bureau which Mrs. Beatrice Auerbach runs for the benefit of the women's organizations of the whole state of Connecticut. The director up to last year was Miss Florence Harrison, now succeeded by Mrs. Chase Going Woodhouse. Miss Harrison has taken a trip around the world. She is planning to go to Russia this summer and to Egypt next January. She told me at the meeting that everywhere she went she met foreign students who had been the concern of the Service Bureau in Connecticut, and she found these contacts were invaluable in getting a knowledge of the people in the countries in which she traveled and in hearing about the real conditions.

Mrs. Woodhouse had a splendid meeting. Two hundred delegates were there, besides women from foreign countries.

An amusing little coincidence happened to me. The State Department had asked me if I could possibly see an Indonesian newspaperwoman whom they were guiding throughout the country. They said she would be leaving within two days and could I possibly see her on Thursday. I explained I had to take an 11 o'clock train on Thursday morning and could see her only at 9 a.m. She appeared on time and we had a pleasant visit. But as I was entering the conference building at the Divinity School in New Haven, the first person I met was the young Indonesian newspaperwoman! I had certainly given her an unnecessary trip, for if I had explained I was on my way to New Haven we could easily have met there!

Several other Indonesian women were present at the meeting. These included Mrs. Carmella Renner from Sierra Leone, Africa, who had also been to see me, and a number of others whom I had met a few times. There was a delightful musical program after dinner, and then an interesting session at which I spoke. Dr. Lillian Gilbreth gave a most interesting address on the subject of "Are We Educating Our Young Women Realistically?" There was also an informative speech by Miss Jacobson telling of the UNESCO educational work in underdeveloped areas. My greatest pleasure was to find Lady Stella Reading there. She flies away today, but it was a joy to have a glimpse of her again.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL