My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—The Mayor's Hospitality Committee for the United Nations was host to a number of people from foreign delegations Wednesday afternoon at New York's Botanical Gardens. It was a great disappointment to all that the rain prevented them from circulating more through the gardens outside.

Driving through the road to the restaurant, we noticed how simply gorgeous the azaleas were. And there was an interesting period before tea was served in which a woman very ably demonstrated flower arrangements of different kinds. She did them beautifully and made you feel that it would be easy to follow her advice and, in doing so, you easily could be surrounded in your own home with the most artistic flower arrangements.

For those who are worried about fluoridation, the New York City Department of Health now has available printed copies of a leaflet giving the facts on this water treatment.

I have had many conflicting letters on this subject—some for it, some against it—but, on the whole, this leaflet seems to me the most enlightening and helpful in deciding what we would like to see New York City do in this matter.

Fluoridation arguments are summed up on the last page in the following manner: For nine cents a year, tooth decay in children can be cut 60 percent. Sixteen new cavities that might otherwise appear in young people's mouths every year may be prevented. We may reduce a source of pain and infection and make our youngsters' lives healthier and happier.

One of the things that has been said of fluoridation is that it is dangerous. This pamphlet states that fluoride is a natural substance found in all drinking water and in many foods. Fluoride concentrates in the enamel of one's teeth, and in having a sufficient amount of it, one has strong enamel which prevents decay.

Millions of Americans drink fluoridated water without any harm. It is most valuable to children and the resistance to decay which they develop will last throughout their lives.

I do not expect that these facts will convince those who are opposed to artificial fluoridation, but they seem to me to make it worth a try, at least.

The United Nations Public Information Service has a pamphlet entitled "How to Find Out About the U.N.," and in this pamphlet the reader is told what material is available which will give more information. The cost of the pamphlet is 25 cents.

I also have received a number of leaflets about various activities of the U.N., such as a reprint on the conference which studied the food resources found in the sea. There is one pamphlet on the U.N. and all nongovernmental organizations which have a consultative status with the agency.

There is a brief but comprehensive statement on the International Labor Office and the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development.

All these leaflets can be obtained from the Department of Public Information at the U.N., and I think you will find them helpful in learning more about this agency and its activities.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL