My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—I read with interest Monday morning an article in one of our metropolitan papers. It told of the result of a study where there has been a contest between the application of Federal and state laws in Federally-owned land areas throughout the nation.

I have not seen this report nor have I had an opportunity to study it, but as I read the article it seemed to me that the report might bring up some rather important difficulties. One of the recommendations, for instance, is that state laws and law enforcement authority should apply in Federal areas.

Does this mean that on government installations, such as those of the Army and Navy, state laws would apply in the matter of segregation?

I can see how it might be well, in the case of fish and game laws or even of traffic laws, to let the state laws take precedence. But I must say observance of traffic laws would be simpler if they were uniform throughout the United States.

I hope this report will be studied carefully by those who will be responsible for the enabling legislation which must be passed before any changes are made.

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Last Saturday, after a pleasant morning in Hyde Park, I motored to Syracuse on the New York State Thruway. It was my first experience on this road and I certainly found it an excellent one but very monotonous. Nevertheless, it does make it possible for one to travel in the state much more quickly.

I went up to be with my daughter Saturday evening for her birthday, and Franklin Jr. joined me there. Sunday morning, in a downpour of rain, my children walked for an hour and a half over land which Anna and her husband bought, and I looked over the farmhouse on which some repairs are being made before they move in. I think it is going to be very nice and easily will accommodate their very large family.

We left after Franklin had stopped to pick up a six-months-old pointer puppy, which he was bringing back to his farm. I never saw such a well-behaved and sweet dog. It curled up on the back seat and never moved.

I had supper with Franklin and Sue and read aloud for a while to my small grandchild, Nancy, 4, who without fail always brings me the same book to read. I am becoming as familiar as she is with the goops and the things you should not do if you are not a goop!

I got back here in the evening and realized that seven hours is a long time to spend on the road. But, on the whole, I enjoyed it very much.

* * *

Monday was taken up for the most part—at least from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.—with a staff meeting of the American Association for the United Nations at my apartment.

I have been watching for the last developments in the quarrel between the mothers and Park Commissioner Robert Moses over the Tavern on the Green parking lot in Central Park. But I cannot find that anything has been settled as yet. I would not be surprised if Mr. Moses had taken on more than he bargained for when he tangled with a group of these apparently defenseless mothers!

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL