My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—I have to go back a little, even though I have returned to New York, and tell you that I spent Monday morning in San Francisco. It was a lovely spring day, the flowers were out and I thought of Franklin K. Lane, who always talked as though only his beloved California could furnish flowers in abundance!

I managed to do a considerable amount of work in the morning and to shop in two of my favorite stores. Suey Chong greeted me with his usual warmth in Chinatown and Gumps had as many fascinating things as usual, only I had too little time to look about and think of what I might give people next Christmas.

I had the pleasure of seeing Mrs. Henry Grady at lunch and Admiral and Mrs. Macauley. Then I left by plane for Medford, Ore.

In this small town the citizens have held a memorial dinner every spring for six years in memory of my husband. Five times before I had to refuse invitations to attend, so I was very happy that I could go this year.

There were 1,200 people present and many of them must have come from quite a distance, for Medford is not large. The valley is a beautiful one where fruit grows in abundance and I always have associated it in my mind with the wonderful pears and other fruit shipped by my friends, Harry and David, all over the U.S.

As we flew there, we saw the snow-covered mountaintops, and the visibility was good enough for us to see a number of the really high mountains. I spent the night with Mrs. Edward Kelly, enjoying the warmth of her hospitality and the pleasure of seeing an old friend, Mrs. Nan Honeyman, who came down from Portland, Ore.

I did one television appearance on the way from the plane to Mrs. Kelly's home, and Tuesday morning the reporters appeared to ask me questions about Adlai Stevenson and his candidacy, as well as about my feeling for Senator Wayne Morse.

I was happy to be able to speak for Senator Morse, as I think no one can question his integrity and courage. The fact that he and Senator Herbert H. Lehman cast the only two votes against Senator James O. Eastland to head up the Senate Judiciary Committee speaks volumes for the kind of a man he is.

I met with the American Association for the United Nations group in Medford and received a gift of $100 for the National Association for the U.N. which I deeply appreciated.

At 11:35 Tuesday morning I left Medford by plane for San Francisco, arriving at 1:25 p.m. I drove at once to Ross in Marin County, California, where the local association for the U.N. had a very good meeting.

Later, I was driven to Oakland. There, I had the pleasure of looking out of my window in the Claremont Hotel at the lovely view of the bay while resting and dressing for the evening membership meeting of two chapters of the Association for the U.N. there.

They also had a large dinner and I was delighted to see some of the consuls from other countries, among them my old friend, Sir Robert Hadow, and his wife.

Finally, I got on the 11 p.m. plane and arrived in Idlewild Wednesday morning at 10:30.

Wednesday night I attended the dinner here for Adlai Stevenson. This was a great success and, instead of the feeling of discouragement which seemed to be in many people's minds after the Minnesota primary, there was enthusiasm and a determination to win both the nomination and the Presidency of the U.S.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL