My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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SAN FRANCISCO—A good flight from Salt Lake City Friday night brought me into Denver, Colo., about 12:45 a.m. and I was hurried to Braniff Airlines, checked in, and left on a 1 a.m. plane for Dallas, Tex., where I arrived at a little before 6 o'clock Saturday morning. By my time, however, it was nearly 7.

I took a limousine into the Texas Hotel in Fort Worth, which a message at the airport told me to do. There I changed to a taxi and went out to the Western Hills Hotel, where all of my Elliott Roosevelt family was staying.

On the steps, awaiting my arrival, was my grandson, Tony—very penitent because he had intended meeting me at the Dallas Airport and had overslept. I told him I was really relieved that I had not been met there. But then he confided in me that he thought his father and my grandson, Bill, Elliott's oldest son, had gone to meet me at the Hotel Texas, in Fort Worth, and I had missed them. And sure enough, when I finished my breakfast, I met both of them returning from the fruitless search for me. We evidently had missed each other by a few minutes.

At breakfast, I had my first glimpse of the bridegroom, Henry Lindsley III, who said he was up early because he couldn't sleep. I told them I was going to get two hours' sleep and to call me at 11:30 a.m., which they did.

Then I gradually saw all the other members of the family, and my granddaughter, who was to be married in the evening, came in with Henry. I found that all of his family also were staying at the hotel. And, if anything, he has a larger family than ours.

His mother was one of five sisters and they were all at the wedding. His father was best man and I began to meet all these new relatives at a delightful luncheon party given in the hotel by some old friends of Chandler's and her mother.

Before the lunch, however, I had to meet the press and the photographer. This I considered unnecessary on a day when only the bride and groom should be of interest.

It is the custom in Texas to have evening weddings, so the young people were married at 8 o'clock and their wedding reception was held at the country club at 8:30. The church was quite lovely, I thought, and crowded by the relatives and friends of those in the wedding party.

I came to realize before the evening was out that a tremendous number of people had known Chandler and her mother and Henry and his family for an endless number of years.

I thought that Elliott, with his oldest daughter on his arm, made a very delightful picture coming up the aisle. She is a lovely child and had a most beautiful wedding dress and veil.

There were many bridesmaids and ushers, but no one as charming on the return trip down the aisle as the young newly-married couple. Henry Lindsley is six feet five and I think as nice a young man as he is handsome.

The decorations in the church and in the club really were lovely. Flowers seemed to grow in profusion in Texas and they were everywhere. The bride and groom's wedding cake was tremendous and stood on a beautifully-decorated table.

I know that the bride's mother always has the greatest burden at a wedding, but I think in this case Ruth must have felt that everything went well and had been beautifully arranged.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL