My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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SALT LAKE CITY—The trip here from New York on Thursday was marvelously smooth, and the night one of the most beautiful I've ever seen. With the moon and the stars shining brightly you could look down and see the ground even though we were 18,000 feet up. When we came into Denver the many colored lights made the city glitter, and flying over the mountains as we neared Salt Lake we could see the snow below us.

We were met by two devoted members of the American Association for the United Nations, Mr. Skeen and Mr. Warshaw, even though it was one o'clock in the morning, and three o'clock by New York time. They took us straight to the Hotel Utah, and I awoke in the morning to the most glorious view of snow-capped mountains. The air is wonderful in Salt Lake City, and spring is much more evident than in New York. Nearly all the trees are in leaf, the grass is green and red tulips are blooming in the grounds around the great Mormon Tabernacle.

I started my day on the university campus at 9:30 a.m. addressing the model assembly put on by the high schools of the state of Utah. Every country was represented, and one high school that had come in late was allowed to represent Japan and come in with an appeal for membership. This is the biggest model assembly I have ever seen from the view of numbers, and they also showed a great deal of interest. Each group represented a different country and had an adviser from the school staff. I must say that these advisers had done a most remarkable piece of work. Music was furnished by a high school band from a nearby place and it was extraordinarily good.

At 11 o'clock I spoke in the same auditorium, but this time to the university students. As on the first occasion, not only the main floor but also the gallery was filled. For this session we had a question period, but the first question took so long to answer that we had time for no more.

We went over to the building next door for lunch. We had to be taken through the kitchen, and I was impressed by the activity that went on there. Many meals were being served in many different places and it was a marvel to me that they came out so very well. All these activities are sponsored, of course, by the Utah Association for the United Nations. They have a large board, and Mrs. Vivian Snow, the chairman, has certainly done a remarkable piece of work. Under her inspiration Mrs. Brewster had found homes that would take in both the advisers and the students who had come here for the model assembly, and though she is in the hospital she has had her finger on all the arrangements.

The luncheon was attended by AAUN officials, heads of organizations cooperating with the AAUN, and faculty advisers of the model assembly. While I addressed them, Mr. Eichelberger spoke at a businessmen's luncheon in town. Later he joined us and answered questions after I left the luncheon at the university. I paid a short visit to Mrs. Snow, then came to the hotel to do my column and get a little rest before the evening banquet and meeting at which I spoke.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL