My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—I was driven out to John Golden's home by Dr. Earle Pleasant at 11:30 Wednesday morning for a luncheon meeting of the Women's Auxiliary of the Council of Churches and Synagogues.

The meeting was in memory of the late John Golden, one of its finest citizens. I was glad to be the speaker at this occasion and to get a glimpse of Mr. Golden's sister and niece, who sat at a table near me.

When you are very fond of someone and when his influence on the life of his community and its people make him seem very much alive, it is easy to speak about him. And I was happy afterward to hear from a number of people that, while I spoke, they still thought of John Golden as a member of their community.

I shall always think of Mr. Golden as a person who wanted to give continually—to his family, his friends, his neighbors. And to all humanity he did give of his great capacities in many fields.

When I arrived home I met Ray T. Hickok, who has accepted the chairmanship of the United States Committee for the United Nations which is primarily concerned with celebrating U.N. Day.

I was glad to assure him that the American Association for the United Nations would, of course, cooperate with him in the celebration of U.N. Day throughout the country.

There will be confusion, I am sure, in the minds of some people between these two organizations. The AAUN is the association that works, on a membership basis, to create interest in what the United Nations is and does, whereas the other organization furnishes information the year 'round but particularly promotes the celebration of U.N. Day. Both of us, however, have a similar objective of serving the United Nations. I hope that people will become accustomed to having two organizations in this field with the same objective but working in slightly different ways.

For a long time I have been interested in the school lunch program. I wonder if the people of this country realize that, while the Federal subsidy for these lunches used to run about nine cents a meal, cuts in Federal appropriations in recent years have cut it to one, two or three cents.

The lunch program has been getting all the butter and other surplus commodities it can use, but equipment costs and wages of cafeteria workers have risen substantially.

On the whole, I think that those in the Federal government have been proud to point out to Congress how little the program cost the government. And we also should be proud, I think, of how much we spend on this particular project.

If Sweden can do so well by its children in this respect, it seems to me we might do better than we are now. I think a few questions asked by interested persons would be helpful, although I don't expect that Agriculture Secretary Ezra Taft Benson will tell any Congressman who makes inquiries about this project that he would like more money for its support.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL