My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—Tuesday was a day of dedications! I took the 11:20 a.m. train to Stamford, Conn., to go to the Roosevelt School, which was named after my husband when it was started in Hyde Park 10 years ago. It now has moved to Shippan Point in Stamford and the chapel was dedicated Tuesday in my honor. A bronze tablet, with an inscription written by Claude Bowers, was unveiled as part of the ceremony.

It was a great pleasure for me to see Mr. and Mrs. Claude Bowers and, since we do not meet very often, I always regret that it does not happen much more frequently. Mr. Cooper, who has been one of the moving spirits in the restoration of Monticello and who has been interested in the Roosevelt School from the beginning, presided at the ceremonies.

I was back in New York by 5:30 p.m. and at 7:30 p.m. I was called for to go to the dedication of the new elementary school at Avenue D and 12th St. here. It is a beautiful building and the kindergarten room, with its playground outside, must be a joy and delight to every mother in the neighborhood.

The program was long but ran absolutely on time. I was happy to get a glimpse of the school even though, because of the crowds, the tour was, of necessity, very brief. Dr. William Jansen, New York City superintendent of schools, presided and a number of other school and city officials were present.

New York City, they tell me, is beginning to build more new public schools and if they are all as delightful as this one, they will serve a good purpose.

I was glad to see the gymnasium actually being used by the young people while the meeting was going on. This indicated to me that this building is being used in off-hours as well as during the school period.

President Charles H. Silver, of the Board of Education, who is assigned to the district in which this public school No. 34 is situated, is very proud of the new school. It is the first new elementary building to be erected on the East Side in more than 30 years.

The children sang in choral groups and one choral recitation I enjoyed particularly. I think my husband would like to have his name perpetuated in the city in many ways and I am happy that one of them should be in connection with this school, which serves the future through the children of the city.

Speaking of children, I have just been sent a little paperbound publication called "A Wonderful World for Children," by Peter Cardozo. It is intended for parents and tells them how many sources of entertainment and education are available to their children free or for very little expenditure in money.

I think parents will find this little book, published by Bantam Books, suggestive and valuable.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL