My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

HYDE PARK—Friday afternoon in Washington, D.C., I had the pleasure of having tea with Mrs. Helm and seeing a few friends before going to my son's house for an early dinner. Then I went to St. Luke's Church, where I was to speak on "The Church and the United Nations."

A number of churches have undertaken to educate their parishioners somewhat as to the activities of the United Nations. Not long ago I spoke at a church in New York, and this was the first request I have had from a church in Washington. Mrs. Dunn, wife of the Bishop of Washington, came and I was glad to see our old Hyde Park rector, Mr. Wilson and his wife. They had a friend staying with them from Hyde Park, who rejoiced over having not been here last weekend when we had our freak snowstorm!

Washington, of course, is far ahead of either New York City or Hyde Park as far as spring weather is concerned. As I drove from the airport I saw the cherry blossoms in full bloom. Crab apple blossoms were out, and the willows and many other trees are already in leaf. Forsythia was fully out, and daffodils were everywhere. It made me envious in a way, but it will come to us here too.

Saturday morning I took the eight o'clock plane back to New York. I was met by my car and motored straight to Hyde Park, where I have to own that not even the willows showed much sign of spring. After lunch on Saturday Mr. James B. Myers, who is the new National Park Service superintendent, came over to show me some slides they have made of the old house and grounds and the library, for use in schools and wherever requested. They say that they have had many requests for such material, but never before had anything to send. This is their first effort, so I was interested to see the slides and hear the recording.

Saturday evening I had tickets for a benefit concert in Red Hook given by Mr. Henry Scott, who lives in Rhinebeck and is giving his services for the benefit of Bard College. This is part of Bard College's local drive for funds, and it was the first time that Mr. Scott had appeared in his native territory in some years. He is a finished musician, but he has the gift of making fun with music and has developed some most amusing parodies on well-known classical music. I was sorry not to be able to go myself, but sent some appreciative friends.

Sunday I went to church and then at the library met a group of people from the American Association for the United Nations with our three guests from abroad—Mr. Judd of England, who is chairman of the executive committee of the World Federation of United Nations Associations, Mr. Cochaux of Belgium, a former chairman, and Dr. Kappeyne of the Netherlands, who is the treasurer of the WFUNA. They came over and lunched with me after their visit to the library and the house and grounds.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL