My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—Everyone must have been shocked, as I was, to read of the acid attack on labor columnist Victor Riesel. The police must find the cowardly creature who did this thing, for it is not an attack on an individual alone, but it endangers the right of all people to express their opinion in print. And if we reach the point where people must be afraid to do this, we will be in a very bad way, indeed.

I also read with anxiety about the new disturbance in the Gaza area, a flare-up which seems to have been of considerable magnitude. The United Nations' plea finally succeeded in bringing about an armistice and, naturally, each side accuses the other of having started the trouble.

I do not wonder that Dr. Dag Hammarskjold starts on his mission with a plea to everyone to remember that he is only taking a first step on a very long road to peace. But it is a first step, and for that most of us will be grateful.

Personally, I do not see how it is possible to stop these incidents until a neutral patrol is placed along the entire border. I understand the fear of all the countries involved, for they do not want foreign soldiers on their soil. But, in that case, they should have devised a way to prevent incidents long ago.

As it is now, I see no end to these repeated incidents, which cause loss of life on both sides, except the placing of a neutral patrol to preserve existing boundaries and insisting that there shall be no aggression from either side.

I have a communication from the American Meat Institute, which evidently was concerned about the question, which I discussed previously, of humane treatment of animals in slaughtering practices.

The institute informs me that there is a new instrument used to replace the way animals, in the past, were stunned before they were killed, and that the development came about in cooperation with the American Humane Association.

It says that the American Humane Association and the American Meat Institute "are fully aware of the desirability of developing the most improved method of handling livestock and will continue efforts energetically to find answers to all problems arising in connection therewith."

It is good to find the commercial interests working with the humane interests on this question.

There is an interesting thing being done by the St. Louis, Mo., Council on World Affairs to stimulate the interest of high school youths in international questions. It is called "The High School Tour."

Under the plan, high school seniors interested in our federal government and in the U.N. are offered a six-day trip to Washington, D.C., and to New York City for $99.75, which includes all expenses. More than 400 students will take the trip between April 30 and May 5. Almost one-third of these come from Kansas and Nebraska. The remainder are from the St. Louis area.

Two days will be spent in Washington, where the State Department will give the students a briefing on the United States participation in the U.N., and the mornings of May 3 and 4 will be spent at the U.N. Headquarters in New York. The groups will be accompanied by parents and teachers, who will act as chaperones.

The idea grew out of the model U.N. General Assembly which is being conducted in high schools in that area. The St. Louis chapter of the American Association for the U.N. has cooperated in this project with the St. Louis Council on World Affairs.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL