My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK—My trip to Pittsburgh and the Teachers College at Indiana, Penn., went smoothly, and the model assembly which various colleges in the eastern section had put on there was completely successful.

Some of the students who drove to the meeting got caught in the mountains by the snow and had a pretty hard time of it. But a dance was going on when I arrived, and they seemed to be able to enjoy themselves despite any weariness entailed by the various travels. I spoke at the final session on Friday morning and then answered questions during a 20-minute period. Their questions were excellent and they seemed an interesting group of young people. Presiding was a Princeton boy who will graduate this year and who did a particularly competent job.

I returned to New York right after lunch and arrived in time to make a train up to Poughkeepsie at 6:25. There is still snow on the ground and it is hard to believe that Easter is here. In New York, my taxicab driver insisted that the people would be out in all their finery in the city on Easter Sunday. When I suggested that it might be too cold, the answer came at once: "These New Yorkers will wear their finery anyway."

I am afraid that up here in the country, however, I am not going to be very springlike, for it seems to me much too cold to go out in any new finery. But perhaps I will overcome my backwardness and wear my new straw Easter bonnet.

I found my cousin, Mrs. Forbes Morgan, here with the two children when I arrived. More of our friends will arrive during the day, but I am afraid there is not very much in the country even for children to do just at the present time. There are no winter sports, yet enough snow on the ground to keep you from walking comfortably in the woods; and we can't do any of the things which we will do once spring is really here, such as putting the tennis court in order. Actually, the only reason we come to the country just now is to rest, to sit in front of an open fire and read a book or sleep through a good part of an afternoon. Those are the real reasons for whatever time you spend in the country at this season. Shortly, however, I hope we can see the snow melt away and a few of the early spring flowers come up. Then the busy planting time will be here and we can begin to plan for the summer flowers.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL