My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—On Friday night Mrs. Joseph Lash and I cooperated in a party given in Mr. and Mrs. Lash's apartment on West 11th St. in honor of Mrs. Robert Magidoff whose book, "Nila," as told to Mrs. Willie Snow Ethridge, has been out just a short time.

The book has been most successful so far and has brought suggestions that the material be used as a play or a movie. I can only say what I have said before—that I found the book interesting and amusing and a most vivid story.

To give a party for Nila was really a joy. She is a warm and delightful human being. She has just come back from a lecture trip which, while it seems to have been exhausting, was, I am sure, most successful. I cannot imagine anyone who would not have found her interesting as well as inspiring to listen to. For she has such an appreciation of the value of her American citizenship that it stirs those of us who are apt to take our blessings for granted.

Two authors and lecturers, married and working full–time, still find that the way to financial success is not easy for those who write books. But I hope Mr. and Mrs. Magidoff will have many books which, both from the artistic point of view and the financial point of view, will be successful in the future.

This year is the 100th anniversary of Woodrow Wilson's birth and various meetings are being held and lectures being given in his memory.

But there is one memorial which I think many people will be particularly anxious to have a part in, and that is the Woodrow Wilson Memorial in the Washington, D.C., Cathedral.

In early March, the last of the cut-stone arrived from Indiana to complete the beautiful little chapel, which is more than half built. The intricate carving remains to be done, the marble floor still must be designed and laid and the tomb installed.

It is hoped that the chantry chapel be in readiness for the memorial service on November 11 this year, when it will be dedicated.

An appeal has come to me asking that friends, and particularly those who hold Woodrow Wilson's memory in respect, will send in contributions to swell the funds which so far have been raised. These funds as yet cover only about half the cost and the Cathedral is anxious to see the full amount raised this spring, if possible.

I think President Wilson would have liked to feel that as many of his fellow citizens as possible had a part in this memorial, for he loved the Cathedral and would have taken pride and comfort in the feeling that a chapel there would be built and used as a memorial to him.

Much that has happened for the benefit of our citizens in later years stemmed from Woodrow Wilson's administration. It is fitting, I think, that his 100th anniversary should be remembered in this way.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL