My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—A few days ago I received an interesting collection of stories called "Youth, Youth, Youth." I liked the collection very much and think many boys will get a great deal out of it.

The idea behind this collection is that we rarely know what goes on in other people's minds and should be more alert in trying to help them. I think you will find this book an acceptable gift to any high school boy.

Some time ago, in a letter from the South which I quoted, the statement was made that even the League of Women Voters practiced segregation there. The writer of the letter was trying to convey the fact that many organizations which stood for equality on a national level lost their courage and modified their standards out of fear of the feeling they encountered in the South.

My correspondent seems to have been correct because I received a letter from Mrs. John G. Lee, president of the League of Women Voters, who said:

"In your column of February 25, as it appeared in the Washington news, there is a comment on the League of Women Voters which is not correct. The league has no policy of segregation and its services are, indeed, made available to all citizens. I hesitated to call this to your attention, but I thought you might receive some inquiries about league policies."

I have received no inquiries, for evidently it is fairly well understood throughout the country what the national policy of the league is. But the point made by my correspondent seems to be correct on the local level. Even the league and its courageous members have had to bow to local prejudice.

I spent all day Saturday in Hartford, Conn., presiding at the second annual Hartford Intercollege Forum on the subject, "The Citizen in the Community."

Presiding always is an easy job and one I really enjoy, particularly when I have such interesting people as I had at this forum. In addition, I had the great pleasure of visiting my old friend, Mrs. Beatrice Auerbach, and of being taken to a very interesting collection, gathered by John Case, of items of interest in connection with my husband. Later, I had the opportunity to spend a little time alone with Mrs. Auerbach before I caught an evening plane back to New York.

It was a long day, since I had caught the 8:35 train up to Hartford in the morning, having been warned carefully that though the service on the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad was improving, it had not yet reached perfection and I had better arrive a little ahead of time!

The flight back was over almost before it started and I was home at a fairly early hour, busying myself with the mail until my son, James, came back from the theatre. Fortunately, he did not leave until Sunday afternoon. So, while we both have been busy since he came up from Washington Thursday evening, we did have a chance to spend a good part of Sunday in leisurely fashion.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL