My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—My one-day visit to Minnesota was a busy one and it was heartwarming, too. The large luncheon in Minneapolis Tuesday was enthusiastic for Adlai Stevenson, who was campaigning in the primary election there.

Then, because the weather had closed in and we could not fly, we drove all the way to Chisholm on the state's Iron Range. Everything along the way was covered with snow, and the roads, for part of the way, were not too clear. But we had a wonderful driver and made good time. And the people in Chisholm were patient in waiting for us.

The Chisholm area is peopled by many nationalities, particularly Scandinavian, and some of the names are hard to pronounce. But the warmth of these people's welcome and their devotion, as Democrats, to Mr. Stevenson was unmistakable.

The Slovene Hall in Chisholm was crowded and people waited out on the street to get into the charmingly-decorated room and shake hands. Women of many lands had brought their home-baked specialties, and I never tried so many varieties of cookies and cakes! Perhaps this was fortunate, since we had no time for dinner and went straight to a meeting in Hibbing.

There, they have one of the most remarkable high schools I have ever seen. It is enormous and the children come to it from all over that area.

The auditorium is large and it was well filled, and again I was happy to find enthusiasm for Mr. Stevenson as our Democratic candidate for President. The meeting was followed by a reception so we did not get away until 10:30 p.m. and reached our hotel in Minneapolis a little after 3:30 a.m.

The Governor of Minnesota, whose state trooper driver was at the wheel of our car that day, certainly has an able and careful chauffeur. I slept a good part of the way, both going and coming, and therefore came through the day much less weary than any of my companions.

I got up quite cheerfully at 6 a.m. Wednesday to catch the 7:30 a.m. plane to New York. We were about an hour late because the wings iced up at Milwaukee.

I got home in time, however, to spend an hour at the office of the American Association for the United Nations and caught up on the mail before going to the Columbia University Institute of Arts and Sciences where I gave a short talk in the MacMillan theatre.

Two movies on the United Nations, shown after my talk, were very good for the kind of informative workship on the U.N. that the institute is conducting.

I seem to have concentrated Stevenson activities into this week, for Thursday afternoon I went to a tea given by Mrs. W.H. Davis, one of a series being held in Mr. Stevenson's behalf.

Alabama is much in the news these days and I want to devote my next column to some of the things most of us feel about a very delicate situation we face in this country.

But there is an activity in Mobile, Ala., which has nothing to do with the racial question but which, I think, is worthy of notice in many parts of the country.

It concerns Alacrafts, an organization which acts as marketing agent for products made by Alabama's homebound blind and severely disabled. It is sponsored by the Alabama Society for Crippled Children and Adults.

This group makes products for firms all over the country and its catalogue, which has been sent to me, is filled with attractive gifts for sale. I hope that both business firms and individuals will investigate this group's products and help along if they can.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL