My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—I returned Tuesday afternoon to New York and to the work of the American Association for the United Nations with a feeling of support from many groups throughout the country. I hope that members of the association will not forget that they will achieve the objective of reaching a maximum number of people if they keep up this cooperation through the whole year.

At our Washington conference, the panels on economic development and collective security and the development of peaceful procedures were very successful. Keynote speaker for the economic development group was Representative Brook Hays, of Arkansas, who served on the United States delegation at the United Nations this past session.

The meeting on collective security and the development of peaceful procedures was keynoted by James N. Hyde, a New York attorney, and Richard R. Wood, contributing correspondent to The Friends Journal.

I had a reunion at a dinner, given by Mr. and Mrs. James Simsarian, with some of the people who worked with me on the Commission on Human Rights in days gone by.

One of the morning meetings was on "Atoms for Peace" and another on "Colonialism and the Struggle for Independence." These were followed by a luncheon meeting and discussion on developments in disarmament, continuing until 4:30 p.m.

The United States Committee for the United Nations Children's Fund arranged a meeting from 5 to 6 p.m. and later in the evening a reception was held in honor of diplomatic representatives of states affiliated with the United Nations. This was planned particularly to welcome the representatives of states admitted to the United Nations in the last session.

The next morning, at the final plenary session, the findings of each section was presented to the conference and we closed at a luncheon meeting presided over by the chairman of our board of directors, Oscar A. De Lima.

Representative Chester E. Merrow, of New Hampshire, who served on the delegation to the United Nations last year, and myself tried to tell all those who have showed such an interest in the United Nations, and the work of their own organization as it affected the United Nations, what this interest would mean to the United States.

I particularly hope that I was able to express to the cooperating groups what it means to the AAUN to find so many persons genuinely wanting to work together to achieve the results which are the chief reason for this organization being in the field of international interest.

The weather in Washington was unpredictable all the time we were there. It alternated from clear, blue skies and balmy winds to gusts of rain, flurries of snow and, at moments, high winds.

My son, James, returned in time for us to have breakfast together, and so my first evening and last morning in Washington were pleasant family occasions. And I did succeed one afternoon in getting Mrs. Warren Robbins and Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Houghteling together for tea with me, so that I combined some family reunions with this otherwise strictly business trip.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL