My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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URBANA, Ill.—We had a pleasant dinner Tuesday evening and then a successful meeting, with enough questions following my talk to keep me there until 10:30.

For breakfast Wednesday morning we were joined by Don Pryor and Mrs. Fox, both on the staff of the Stevenson for President Committee.

A little after 10 a.m. President James Sparling, of Roosevelt University, came to see me, bringing Harland H. Allen, of the Edward A. Filene Good Will Fund.

Mr. Allen has spent his life as an investment counsellor and was chosen by Mr. Filene as one of the people to serve on his foundation. I was glad to meet him and to have an opportunity to hear some of his ideas which may in the future be of benefit to Roosevelt University.

When they had gone, I was called for by Wells Burnette, a representative of the group that is planning a salute to Mr. Sparling on his birthday March 14, when he will be 60 years old. This is also the 20th anniversary of his being a college president though Roosevelt University has been in existence only eleven years.

The meeting the next morning was a meeting of the women's committee and each person present was asked to assure the attendance of 10 or more people. Since it is a 60th birthday dinner, the charge will be $60 per couple. Those present also were asked to list the names of possible workers for this anniversary salute.

I have been trying all morning to read more than the first page of the paper and I have not as yet succeeded. However, everyone will rejoice in the news that the President's health is sufficiently assured for him to have five or ten years of hard work still before him.

The decision of whether this work shall be in the White House or not is one that he evidently is undertaking to wrestle with in the few days that he will spend at Secretary of the Treasury George M. Humphrey's estate in Georgia. Whether that means he is consulting Mr. Humphrey on this or whether it means he will make his decision without consulting anyone, no one knows. But he has announced that he will make this decision by the first of March and everyone in his own party will wait anxiously for the final word.

As far as the Democrats are concerned, I think that any candidate should plan his campaign on the issues he feels important, no matter who runs on the Republican party ticket. It seems to me that we need a clarification of what the Democratic program is before anyone can make a decision.

The Republicans have a record of four years which should be examined by both parties and the country must make its decision on the record and on the issues as to what they feel is best for the nation in the coming four years.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL