My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—As usual on my return from a trip, I spent a busy evening at my desk on Thursday, but Friday morning we had an executive committee meeting at the American Association for the United Nations office and I had plenty of work on my desk there as well.

Clark Eichelberger also had come back from abroad from the Executive Committee meeting of the World Federation of U.N. Associations on Thursday morning and his report of this meeting was very satisfactory.

I had the pleasure of having C.R. Smith and my youngest son, John, and his wife, Anne, for luncheon and I had two appointments in the afternoon. The rest of my time was spent in trying to catch up with a little of the reading that always accumulates when I go away.

I find, among other things, some material about the Council Against Intolerance in America and I am much interested in its map of the country, which is called "America a Nation of One People From Many Countries."

The map shows where some of the descendants from these many countries live today and what they do. Down in one corner there are names of great Americans in various fields who have come to us from far-off lands. This legend also tells to what religions they belong. With the exception of the Indians, all Americans or their forebears came from other countries, and if there is a country that should be able to appreciate the values of diversity and unity, this is the one!

The Council Against Intolerance also publishes an educational guide, called American Unity, which can be used in study groups in schools. It would be interesting if in every community the youngsters made a survey of which countries had contributed to the development of the community in which they live. It also would be valuable to know how the population has changed and shifted through the years.

This organization is a force for education and one that I think should be used now when the question of integration is uppermost in so many communities.

I also find material here from another group, doing much good work on the development of young American girls—the Girl Scouts of America. Girl Scout week this year is from March 11 to March 17. Many of us will buy cookies that week and enclosed with them will be a recipe for making a favorite Girl Scout dish, called "Some Mores a la Girl Scout," I quote it here because I think many non-Girl Scouts will enjoy it.

All you need is four thin squares of plain chocolate, two Graham crackers and one marshmallow. You toast the marshmallow slowly over coals or in the oven until brown. You put the chocolate square on the Graham cracker, then the marshmallow, then another Graham cracker. And you will want "some more," as the Girl Scouts say. If you get tired of the chocolate, use slices of apple, pineapple or peanut butter instead.

They also tell me there will be an encampment of 5,000 Girl Scouts and their leaders in Pontiac, Mich., by far the biggest Girl Scout get-together ever held. There will be Girl Scouts from every state and territory and from many other countries of the Western Hemisphere. This will be an exciting experience. So if you are a Girl Scout anywhere, be sure you have a representative at this roundup.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL